Fasque was the property of the Ramsays of Balmain, and the present house was completed around 1809, replacing an earlier house. It was purchased in 1829 by Sir John Gladstone, 1st Baronet, father of William Ewart Gladstone, later Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, who often stayed there. Fasque was a family home of the Gladstones until the 1930s, and was open to the public during the last quarter of the 20th century. In 2010 Fasque House was bought by Fasque House Properties Ltd and restoration work was begun.

The house is a large sandstone building, in a symmetrical castellated style, with octagonal towers at the centre and corners of the main facade. The structure remains relatively unchanged since its completion. Sir John Gladstone added a third storey to the central tower in 1830, and built the portico of rusticated pillars in the 1840s. The drawing room was expanded in 1905, and some servants' quarters were added before the beginning of the First World War.

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Founded: 1809
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

julie inglis (2 years ago)
The most incredible place. Beautiful building, grounds and the rooms are furnished to a very high standard. The wonderful thing about Fasque is that you have the whole place for your group, all the benefits and luxuries of a hotel but with the intimacy and flexibility of a rented property. The staff are wonderful. Grounds extensive and immaculate. Once you visit, you won't want to leave!
Mandy Ogilvie (3 years ago)
Beautiful location
Kevin Lundrigan (3 years ago)
Incredible.
Hillary Kerr (3 years ago)
Very lovely setting for a wedding
Roy Adamson (3 years ago)
Simply beautiful.
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