Inchdrewer Castle is a 16th-century tower house in the parish of Banff. Originally owned by the Currour family, it was purchased by the Ogilvies of Dunlugas in 1557 and became their main family seat. The Ogilvies were staunch Royalists, which resulted in the castle coming under attack from the Covenanters in 1640. 

George Ogilvy, 3rd Lord Banff was murdered in 1713 and his body hidden inside the castle, which was then set on fire. The castle came under siege again in 1746, during the Jacobite rebellion. At the start of the 19th century, following the death of the 8th Lord Banff, the property was inherited by the Abercromby of Birkenbog family, who leased it to a tenant. It became uninhabited after 1836 and the structure deteriorated.

Over the following century the neglect continued until some basic external renovation work was undertaken between 1965 and 1971, making the structure wind and water tight, although it remained unoccupied. The castle was again abandoned and left unmaintained. The condition of the building further declined, becoming derelict. It was in a ruinous state when marketed for sale in April 2013 after the death of Count Robin Mirrlees, who had owned it for about fifty years. At the end of that year it was purchased by the former model Olga Roh, who said she intended to restore it. Modern day reports suggest that the spirit of the 3rd Lord Banff and that of a white dog haunt the castle.

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Banff, United Kingdom
See all sites in Banff

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shannon Houston (12 months ago)
Walked down a grassy path to the Castle - was surprised at how good condition it was in! But was hoping there might be more to explore - as it is boarded up and has signs saying security cameras in use. So can only really view from the outside, but still worth visiting if you are a Castle lover!
RALLIS KOURMBETIS (13 months ago)
Hi my friends... Walk in Scotland photo by Rallis ..
neil hedley (14 months ago)
Easy to get to, with some stunning views over Aberdeenshire. In the summer months the grass on the path can be over-grown.
Aneliya Beaton (2 years ago)
Peter Peyskens (3 years ago)
Prachtig kasteelruine !!!
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