Martin Luther's Birth House

Eisleben, Germany

Martin Luther's Birth House (Martin Luthers Geburtshaus) is a museum in Eisleben, Germany. The actual house in which Luther was born no longer exists, it having been burnt completely to the ground in 1689.

The German religious reformer Martin Luther was born there in 1483. Opened to the public in 1693, it is a World Heritage Site. In 2005-2007 an expansion was added for visitors; the ensemble has since received five architectural awards.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1693
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Myeongcheol Oh (19 months ago)
You can learn Martin Luther’s life and his ministry.
Tony (20 months ago)
Simple museum on Luther s family and youth.
Kayla Riley (2 years ago)
What a special place to visit! The lingering affects of what Martin Luther set in motion had such important results to the world. Thank you for recognizing his life. While a small musuem, and some times with dark and sad content; it certainly sets the tone of the time he lived through.
Alison Thompson (2 years ago)
This is a very historic place, they had set out a lot information to read - and most of it was translated in to English. Following the route round was easy enough - just follow the numbers! There were quite a lot of steps but there was a lift.
Michael Miller (3 years ago)
This is a good museum of Luther's birth, parents and basic life. Of course, the original house doesn't exist anymore, but this house was rebuilt on the original site and contains a number of great artifacts and interesting information. The route through the museum is a bit confusing, but most everything has an English translation.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.