Martin Luther's Birth House

Eisleben, Germany

Martin Luther's Birth House (Martin Luthers Geburtshaus) is a museum in Eisleben, Germany. The actual house in which Luther was born no longer exists, it having been burnt completely to the ground in 1689.

The German religious reformer Martin Luther was born there in 1483. Opened to the public in 1693, it is a World Heritage Site. In 2005-2007 an expansion was added for visitors; the ensemble has since received five architectural awards.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1693
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick Halle (2 years ago)
Comprehensive exhibition about Luther's life and influence on the region as well as on the entire world in the past and today. Worth seeing. Self-guided tours in several languages available. Group tours upon request.
Myeongcheol Oh (2 years ago)
You can learn Martin Luther’s life and his ministry.
Tony (2 years ago)
Simple museum on Luther s family and youth.
Tony (2 years ago)
Simple museum on Luther s family and youth.
Kayla Riley (3 years ago)
What a special place to visit! The lingering affects of what Martin Luther set in motion had such important results to the world. Thank you for recognizing his life. While a small musuem, and some times with dark and sad content; it certainly sets the tone of the time he lived through.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.