Martin Luther's Death House

Eisleben, Germany

Martin Luther's Death House (Martin Luthers Sterbehaus) is the historic building in Eisleben, where it was incorrectly thought that Martin Luther died on 18 February 1546. Since then it has become a museum and a UNESCO world heritage site. The city of Eisleben, located in Saxony-Anhalt, is also where Martin Luther was born and baptised; his birth house is also a UNESCO world heritage site and museum.

It is now known that in fact Luther died in a house at Am Markt 56, which is currently occupied by the Hotel Graf Mansfeld.

A new exhibition, 'Luthers letzter Weg' (Luther's last path), now chronicles his decease and reveals Luther's attitude to death. The new exhibition contains about 110 exhibits, including historic furniture, documents and signatures, as well as the original cloth that covered Luther's coffin.

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Details

Founded: 1546
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

GARY WEEDEN (21 months ago)
A must stop for anyone doing a Reformation tour.
StRu_ggLe (2 years ago)
Perfect place to visit
Alexander Todt (2 years ago)
Cool
Myeongcheol Oh (2 years ago)
Historical place of Martin Luther
Jim Lee (3 years ago)
Thanks for an enriching insight of the life of Luther. Have a wonderful and meaningful visit
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