The Melanchthonhaus is a writer's house museum in the German town of Lutherstadt Wittenberg. It is a Renaissance building with late Gothic arched windows and the broad-tiered gables. It includes the study of the Protestant Reformer Philipp Melanchthon, who lived there with his family.

In 1954 the house became a museum on Melanchthon's life and work displaying paintings, prints and manuscripts by him and his contemporaries. It became part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site 'Luther Sites in Central Germany' in 1996.

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Details

Founded: 1536
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarah Janning-Picker (22 days ago)
Recommended for people interested in the church reform and its co-reformers, wheelchair accessible I'm very linked to the church reform which today is nearly completely put to Martin Luther. This is why I like the fact that the Melanchtonhaus offers an insight into another reformer who supported Luther in many ways. I got to know a couple of things I hadn't know, although I am into the topic. Only four stars because it's not signposted in English and because the first, actually original building does not show any original objects. These are to be found in the modern part. I assume for conservation purposes. Still, it feels strange... I loved it anyway...
BARTOSZ R (2 years ago)
Great historic monument, developed into an amazing museum.
Melvin Diaz (5 years ago)
Another good place to visit while visiting Wittenberg. Your stop at this place will complement your understanding of the life style and historical context of Martin Luther. There is a collection of objects, including clothes of that time, as well as a good description of the house and its rooms. Also, a short story about Melanchthon and his relation with Martin Luther. There are individuals tickets, however I recommend getting a combined ticket of Lutherhouse and Melanchthonhaus for 10 €.
Melvin Diaz (5 years ago)
Another good place to visit while visiting Wittenberg. Your stop at this place will complement your understanding of the life style and historical context of Martin Luther. There is a collection of objects, including clothes of that time, as well as a good description of the house and its rooms. Also, a short story about Melanchthon and his relation with Martin Luther. There are individuals tickets, however I recommend getting a combined ticket of Lutherhouse and Melanchthonhaus for 10 €.
Bartosz Awianowicz (5 years ago)
A must see for all who are interested in German humanism and reformation!
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