Sandvik Windmill was built in 1856 on the outskirts of Vimmerby and came to Öland only after the factory owner Gustav Hammarstedt on Öland Mechanical Industrial Stone bought in 1885 and had to move it to its current location. It was both dilapidated and in poor condition, among others were missing wings completely. A two-storey high concrete base was then erected on site at the mill was placed. Winged originally with fabric, but these are now replace with damper made ​​of wood.

The eight-storey mill is a so-called Dutch and is the largest in northern Europe, this also makes it to the world’s largest and windmills. The mill over the years has had several different owners. It was purchased in 1955 by Åkerbo hembygdsförening and went through with its agency of an extensive renovation. 1964 he leased it out to become a restaurant and it works today. But already by 1958, the café has been conducted in the mill. The upper floors have been preserved as a museum.

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Details

Founded: 1856
Category:
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

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enjoysweden.se

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tero Marjomaa (3 years ago)
Pizza and lot of bees
Samuel Bladh (3 years ago)
God lufsa
Emil Mason (3 years ago)
Very good food and service. With good parking
Sameer Tatake (4 years ago)
Nice pizza and view of old windmill
Anna Löfstrand (4 years ago)
Cosy with restaurant, ice cream etc
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Antiquarium

Situated in the basement of Metropol Parasol, Antiquarium is a modern, well-presented archaeological museum with sections of ruins visible through glass partitions, and underfoot along walkways.

These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).