Sandvik Windmill was built in 1856 on the outskirts of Vimmerby and came to Öland only after the factory owner Gustav Hammarstedt on Öland Mechanical Industrial Stone bought in 1885 and had to move it to its current location. It was both dilapidated and in poor condition, among others were missing wings completely. A two-storey high concrete base was then erected on site at the mill was placed. Winged originally with fabric, but these are now replace with damper made ​​of wood.

The eight-storey mill is a so-called Dutch and is the largest in northern Europe, this also makes it to the world’s largest and windmills. The mill over the years has had several different owners. It was purchased in 1955 by Åkerbo hembygdsförening and went through with its agency of an extensive renovation. 1964 he leased it out to become a restaurant and it works today. But already by 1958, the café has been conducted in the mill. The upper floors have been preserved as a museum.

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Founded: 1856
Category:
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

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enjoysweden.se

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tero Marjomaa (4 years ago)
Pizza and lot of bees
Samuel Bladh (4 years ago)
God lufsa
Emil Mason (4 years ago)
Very good food and service. With good parking
Sameer Tatake (5 years ago)
Nice pizza and view of old windmill
Anna Löfstrand (5 years ago)
Cosy with restaurant, ice cream etc
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