Cly is a castle in Saint-Denis, overlooking the Dora Baltea river, belongs to the so-called primitive style of castle, consisting of a keep with a surrounding wall. The ruins rise from a bed of metamorphic rock, on the edge of a fault line which extends to the Castle of Quart.

Cly was first mentioned in a document from 1207, in which the 'chapel sancti Mauricij de castro Cliuo' is mentioned among the goods of the Vicarage of Saint-Gilles in Verrès, but the keep has been dated to 1027 using an analysis of the tree rings in its timbers (dendrochronology). Originally a fief held from the Counts of Savoy, in 1376 the direct ownership passed to the Duchy of Savoy, which installed a castellanto administer it for them until abandoned in 1550. The castle fell to ruins in the centuries that followed.

Eventually the castle ruins became the property of the nearby town of Saint-Denis. The castle is visible atop the hill overlooking the town of Chambave. The castle is open to guided tours only in July and August.

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Address

SR12, Saint-Denis, Italy
See all sites in Saint-Denis

Details

Founded: c. 1027
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angelo Malvasia (14 months ago)
Panoramica posizione raggiungibile in auto o a piedi con la bella mulattiera da Chambave. Aspetto severo e maestoso. Aperto solo in poche occasioni.
Matthieu Crétier (2 years ago)
The castle is extremely nice. Despite having been abandoned for several centuries and never truly renovated, it is possible to imagine how it was back in the Middle Age. Deserve a mention the effort of the municipality that opens it every summer. Not to forget the young students that with passion and expertise guide the tourists through the history of the castle and its development. Moreover the ticket is very cheap! Perfect destination for romantic tourists with the gift of imagination!
Maurizio Vrenna (2 years ago)
Although not that easy to find, I strongly recommend this amazing castle! Its ruins are a fantastic example of medieval architecture, and a long history of legendary stories. The view on the valley is stunning! The entrance fee is also very affordable. The guide is great! Five stars!
유호현 (4 years ago)
Door is closed Englisg sign is not available
Jo Pa (5 years ago)
Remote and desolate, fantastically atmospheric ruin
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The original Cochem Castle, perched prominently on a hill above the Moselle River, served to collect tolls from passing ships. Modern research dates its origins to around 1100. Before its destruction by the French in 1689, the castle had a long and fascinating history. It changed hands numerous times and, like most castles, also changed its form over the centuries.

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In 1688 the French invaded the Rhine and Moselle regions of the Palatinate, which included Cochem and its castle. French troops conquered the Reichsburg and then laid waste not only to the castle but also to Cochem and most of the other surrounding towns in a scorched-earth campaign. Between that time and the Congress of Vienna, the Palatinate and Cochem went back and forth between France and Prussia. In 1815 the western Palatinate and Cochem finally became part of Prussia once and for all.

Louis Jacques Ravené (1823-1879) did not live to see the completion of his renovated castle, but it was completed by his son Louis Auguste Ravené (1866-1944). Louis Auguste was only two years old when construction work at the old ruins above Cochem began in 1868, but most of the new castle took shape from 1874 to 1877, based on designs by Berlin architects. After the death of his father in 1879, Louis Auguste supervised the final stages of construction, mostly involving work on the castle’s interior. The castle was finally completed in 1890. Louis Auguste, like his father, a lover of art, filled the castle with an extensive art collection, most of which was lost during the Second World War.

In 1942, during the Nazi years, Ravené was forced to sell the family castle to the Prussian Ministry of Justice, which turned it into a law school run by the Nazi government. Following the end of the war, the castle became the property of the new state of Rheinland-Pfalz (Rhineland-Palatinate). In 1978 the city of Cochem bought the castle for 664,000 marks.