Arch of Augustus

Aosta, Italy

The Arch of Augustus was erected in 25 BC on the occasion of the Roman victory over the Salassi and was the work of Aulus Terentius Varro Murena.

Constructed from conglomerate, the arch has a single vault, with a height to the keystone of 11.4 metres. Its span is a barrel vault, constituting an extension in width of a round arch. In the monument, various styles can be recognised: The ten engaged columns which decorate its facade and its sides culminate in Corinthian capitals, while the entablature, adorned with metopes and triglyphs, is of the Doric order.

During the twelfth century, the arch contained the home of a local noble family and in 1318 a small fortification was built inside it, designed for a corps of crossbowmen. In 1716, because of the numerous leaks that were compromising the integrity of the monument, the attic that previously crowned the arch was replaced with a slate roof.

The arch's modern appearance is the result of a final intervention for restoration and consolidation which occurred in 1912 under the direction of Ernesto Schiaparelli.

The wooden crucifix displayed below the vault is a copy of the one which was placed there in 1449 as a votive offering against the flooding of the river Buthier, which flows a little to the east. The original crucifix is now housed in the Museum of Aosta Cathedral's Treasures.

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Details

Founded: 25 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Frederik Prins (15 days ago)
Impressive old en well preserved triumphal Arch built in 25 BC to mark the victory of the Romans over the Salassi people.
Jean-Jacques Maucuer (2 months ago)
Nice place to start visit of Aosta city center. Parking nearby.
Jeroen Mourik (2 months ago)
As Roman arches go, this is not one to write home a out. The location on the other hand is very nice, as you can see the landmark from afar, perfectly lined up with the pedestrian shopping street, once a Roman road. Aosta wouldn't be the same without it.
zvi yarkon (3 months ago)
Nice nothing More! If you are coming to aosta for this, don't
Udi Miller (3 months ago)
Greatly spared of old times , all around empty area .clean and well marked,bravo Aosta !!! Easy to visit , getting profit of visiting after the long boutiques and coffee shops
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