Libochovice castle is one of the most significant Early-Baroque castles in the Czech Republic. The castle stands at the place of the former Gothic fort, rebuilt by the new owner Jan z Lobkowicz in 1560-1564 to a Renaissance castle. At the end of the 16th century, the castle was confiscated and belonged to the royal family. In 1613, the Libochovice demesne was bought by the High Burgrave Adam ze Štenberka. The House of Šternberk sold the castle in 1676 to Gundakar z Dietrichsteina, who had the castle rebuilt into a Baroque style in 1682-1690. Architect and builder was Antonio della Porta.

In 1685, the decorative gardens were established at the chateau subject to French style gardens. After 1853, the gardens were extended and were changed to the Englisch style gardens. The castle offers exhibition of the interior furnishings of the period with the collections of valuable tapestries, glass, porcelain and a unique Baroque tile stove. The chateau is also famous as being a birthplace of a significant Czech scientist Jan Evangelista Purkyně.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1560-1564
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nikolai Bazaleev (4 months ago)
Great place to have a little walk in the park
Mirek Č (6 months ago)
ok
Thomas F. Koller (2 years ago)
Nice walk in park
Michal Janovský (2 years ago)
Super..
Jan Sicha (2 years ago)
nice location woth well maintained garden (free entry). nice place to stop by....
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.