The Oldřich Oak, also known as the Prince Oldřich Oak, is a Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur) tree located in the market town of Peruc. It is estimated to be about 1,000 years old. The tree has a height of 30 m and a trunk circumference of 810 cm.

The tree derives its name from a legend, set in the 11th century, involving Oldřich of Bohemia and Božena, the mother of his only son. According to the legend, Oldřich set out on a hunt and travelled to Peruc. There, he spied a beautiful peasant girl, Božena, by a well (known today as Božena's spring) and was immediately entranced by her. Oldřich abandoned his hunt and took Božena back to Prague, and she eventually gave birth to his son Bretislaus. In the legend, Oldřich's first meeting with Božena took place in sight of the Oldřich Oak.

The Oldřich Oak is mentioned in the Chronicle of Dalimil.

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    239, Peruc, Czech Republic
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    Founded: 11th century
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    User Reviews

    Dana Hlaváčková (19 months ago)
    Krásné, magické místo staročeské historie. Silná energie, romantické místo.
    Václav Hrbek (20 months ago)
    Jako děti jsme sem rádi z Vranýho jezdili na kole. Už ani nevím, kolik nás tenkrát bylo potřeba, abychom ho obejmuli. Měl košatou zelenou korunu. Dobře skoro dvacet let jsem u něj nezastavil, až před pár dny, kdy mě k sobě magicky přitáhl, když jsem jel okolo. Jako dítě jsem kdysi magii místa nevnímal, dnes již ano. Když vystoupíte z auta, cítíte je klid a energii. Tisíc let a stále tu je. Doporučuji navštívit a kochat se, fakt.
    Karel Orlovec (20 months ago)
    Nadherne misto s historii. Nice place with history.
    Michal Konrád (2 years ago)
    Yes
    Cestmir Ruzicka (3 years ago)
    Although it's just next to a road, it's quiet and nice there.
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