The Dominican Monastery in Ústí nad Labem was founded in 1186. The church was remodelled in Baroque style in 1718-1722 during extensive reconstruction designed by Litoměřice architect Octavio Broggio. At the wish of the Prior of Ústí, he based his design of the St Adalbert Church on the model of the Prague Church of St Ursula. Under the communist regime it was used for storage and later on, whitewashed and stripped of all furnishings, converted into an exhibition hall. The wall paintings from 1928 were probably by Albin Müller. The original monastery was a single-wing structure at first (in 1617-1650), its enlargement being impossible for financial and political reasons, the second wing was added during the Baroque reconstruction. The south wall of the church and monastery merges with the city walls.

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Founded: 1186
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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FUTUR TV (3 years ago)
Beautiful building with an interesting history. Learn how to get to know places not only with your eyes, but the first look is sometimes superficial.
Anna Bohmova (3 years ago)
The historic building, inside is the temple of the Greek Catholic community and the Orthodox Church of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia
Petr Farták (4 years ago)
Přilákala mně výstava obrazů . Vstupné je dobrovolné.
Vladimir Pecha (4 years ago)
Barokní kostel s dominikánským klášterem postavil v letech 1715-1730 významný severočeský stavitel Octavio Broggio na místě stejnojmenné stavby z r. 1070. Šlo patrně o první Broggiův návrh (1704) v dynamičtějším pojetí, poté co na něj zapůsobily pražské stavby, s kterými měl možnost se blíže seznámit, když projektoval kostel Nejsvětější Trojice kláštera trinitářů v Praze. V letech 1928 až 1930 prošel kostel kompletní obnovou. Nicméně klášter vedle kostela stále upadal a tak byla komunita dominikánů v roce 1935 zrušena a je v letech 1935-1945 vystřídali obláti. Po odchodu oblátů v roce 1945 se kláštera ujali opět dominikáni. Kostel byl za vlády KSČ změněn na sklad a později na výstavní síň, byl vybílen a bylo odvezeno veškeré vnitřní vybavení. Nástěnné malby z roku 1928 byly údajně od Albina Müllera. První klášter z let 1617-1650 byl pouze jednokřídlý, větší rozsah v té době nebyl možný z finančních a politických důvodů. V rámci barokní přestavby získal klášter druhé křídlo. Jižní stěna kostela a kláštera v sobě obsahuje městské hradby. The Baroque church with the Dominican monastery was built in 1715-1730 by the notable North Bohemian builder Octavio Broggio in the place of the same name building from 1070. It was probably the first Broggi's proposal (1704) in a more dynamic concept, after he was impressed by Prague buildings with which he had the possibility to get acquainted with the design of the Church of the Holy Trinity of the Trinitarian Monastery in Prague. Between 1928 and 1930, the church underwent a complete renovation. Nevertheless, the monastery next to the church still fell into decline and so the Dominican community was abolished in 1935 and was replaced by the Oblates in the years 1935-1945. After leaving the Oblates in 1945, the monastery took over again the Dominicans. During the reign of the Communist Party, the church was changed to a warehouse and later to the exhibition hall, all internal equipment was discharged and removed. Wall paintings from 1928 were allegedly from Albin Müller. The first monastery from 1617-1650 was only one-winged, the greater extent at that time was not possible for financial and political reasons. As part of the baroque rebuilding, the monastery acquired the second wing. The southern wall of the church and monastery includes city walls.
Vladimir Pecha (4 years ago)
The Baroque church with a Dominican monastery was built in 1715-1730 by the important North Bohemian builder Octavio Broggio on the site of the building of the same name from 1070. It was probably Broggi's first design (1704) in a more dynamic concept, after he was impressed by the Prague buildings. to get acquainted with when he designed the Church of the Holy Trinity of the Trinitarian Monastery in Prague. Between 1928 and 1930, the church underwent a complete renovation. However, the monastery next to the church was still declining, so the Dominican community was abolished in 1935 and replaced by oblates in 1935-1945. After the departure of the oblates in 1945, the monastery was again taken over by the Dominicans. During the reign of the Communist Party, the church was turned into a warehouse and later into an exhibition hall, it was whitewashed and all interior equipment was taken away. The murals from 1928 were allegedly by Albin Müller. The first monastery from 1617-1650 was only single-winged, a larger scale was not possible at that time for financial and political reasons. As part of the Baroque reconstruction, the monastery received its second wing. The south wall of the church and the monastery contains the city walls. The Baroque church with the Dominican monastery was built in 1715-1730 by the notable North Bohemian builder Octavio Broggio in the place of the same name building from 1070. It was probably the first Broggi's proposal (1704) in a more dynamic concept, after he was impressed by Prague buildings with which he had the possibility to get acquainted with the design of the Church of the Holy Trinity of the Trinitarian Monastery in Prague. Between 1928 and 1930, the church underwent a complete renovation. Nevertheless, the monastery next to the church still fell into decline and so the Dominican community was abolished in 1935 and was replaced by the Oblates in the years 1935-1945. After leaving the Oblates in 1945, the monastery took over again the Dominicans. During the reign of the Communist Party, the church was changed to a warehouse and later to the exhibition hall, all internal equipment was discharged and removed. Wall paintings from 1928 were allegedly from Albin Müller. The first monastery from 1617-1650 was only one-winged, the greater extent at that time was not possible for financial and political reasons. As part of the baroque rebuilding, the monastery acquired the second wing. The southern wall of the church and monastery includes city walls.
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