The Semperoper is the opera house of the Saxon State Opera and the concert hall of the Saxon State Orchestra. It is also home to the Semperoper Ballett. The building is located near the Elbe River in the historic centre of Dresden.

The opera house was originally built by the architect Gottfried Semper in 1841. After a devastating fire in 1869, the opera house was rebuilt, partly again by Semper, and completed in 1878.

In 1945, during the last months of World War II, the building was largely destroyed again. Exactly 40 years later, on 13 February 1985, the opera's reconstruction was completed.

The opera house has a long history of premieres, including major works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.

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Founded: 1841/1878
Category:
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J S (2 years ago)
Very nice building and an amazing performance. We bought the tickets couple months ahead online, which worked out very well. The acoustics of the theater were very good. Washrooms were as accessible. Unfortunately we did not manage to get something to drink due to the long queues before and during the performance. They should definitely stop the espresso machine, it took so long and that’s why we could get a drink. Next time I’ll take something with me I guess.
Christine Lewis (2 years ago)
Just a beautiful place. Amazed by the architecture. Well worth a visit if you go to Dresden
Arsal Jalib (2 years ago)
Attended the Ceasar in Egypt show here. The building is really beautiful even though it was renovated in the GDR period and the marble you see is not original. But its amazing nonetheless! The hall itself also is really artistic and beautiful and has a very vintage vibe to it. The staff is super friendly and kind. The ticket office is in the building in front of the Opera and not in it.
Adam D (2 years ago)
Saw a snippet of an opera here through the long night of theater Dresden and was amazed not only by the Opera but also the architecture of the Opera house. Very nice.
Karl Hebert (2 years ago)
Awesome experience! We saw Figaro...I expected to fall asleep three times but only fell asleep twice! Not bad for a three and a half hour show. Seriously, though, this opera house is an amazing sight to see. It was rebuilt to the original specs in 1977.
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