Dresden Cathedral

Dresden, Germany

Dresden Cathedral (Hofkirche) stands as one of Dresden's foremost landmarks. It was designed by architect Gaetano Chiaveri from 1738 to 1751. The church was commissioned by Augustus III, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland while the Protestant city of Dresden built the Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) between 1726 and 1743. The Catholic Elector decided that a Catholic church was needed in order to counterbalance the Protestant Frauenkirche.

In the crypt the heart of King Augustus the Strong is buried along with the last King of Saxony and the remains of 49 other members of the Wettin family, as well as the remains of people who married into the family, such as Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy, wife of Anthony of Saxony.

The church was badly damaged during the bombing of Dresden of the Second World War and was restored during the mid-1980s by the East German government. Today it is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dresden-Meissen.

The cathedral features a carefully restored organ, the last work of the renowned organ builder Gottfried Silbermann. It also contains a Rococo pulpit by Balthasar Permoser.

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Details

Founded: 1738-1751
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ankit Dua (6 months ago)
Katholische Hofkirche is situated in lovely walks of Dresden.Very beautiful and wonderful church.It stands on the old Town Elbufer between the castle and the theater square.The golden - white interior is worth watching.Very peaceful, calm and great place.
Joseph Razmek (6 months ago)
Go for Sunday Mass. The music is amazing.
Shirley Glover (6 months ago)
White and gold interior. Beautiful in both summer and winter. Wonderful to see so many at mass on a week night. All are welcome although naturally the service is in German. We came in quietly out of the cold.
Karl Hebert (6 months ago)
Very cool cathedral. It mostly survived the allied bombing.
HENG heng (6 months ago)
Simple church. Not much wall painting.
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