The Albertinum was built between 1884 and 1887 by extending a former armoury, or arsenal, that had been constructed between 1559 and 1563 at the same location. The new building was designed by the regional master builder Carl Adolf Canzler in the Renaissance Revival style to house the royal Collection of Antique and Modern Sculptures. The building was named after the Saxonian King Albert who reigned at the time. In 1889, the Sculpture Collection was moved in and has since remained there.

Besides the Sculpture Collection, the Albertinum has housed the New Masters Gallery (Galerie Neue Meister) in the upper rooms since 1965. It was also the temporary postwar home of the Numismatic Cabinet (Münzkabinett) and the Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe) until the exhibitions were moved to the rebuilt Dresden Castle in 2002 and 2004.

The floods of 2002 necessitated renovating the Albertinum and building a new flood-proof depository. After closing in 2006, the building was finally reopened on June 20, 2010 as a 'house of the modern' with the New Masters Gallery and the Sculpture Collection.

The Albertinum houses the New Masters Gallery (Galerie Neue Meister) and the Sculpture Collection (Skulpturensammlung). The holdings of the two museums, with paintings ranging from Caspar David Friedrich to Ludwig Richterand sculptures from Auguste Rodin to the 21st century, are displayed on three floors in exhibition halls with a modern look.

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Details

Founded: 1884-1887
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia (3 years ago)
Post romantic masters, including Picasso, Kadinsky and Mondrian. Fascinating and thought provoking.
Simon Gershon (3 years ago)
I only visited the 'new masters' gallery but was really impressed with the collection. I am sure you will find more than one painting which 'speaks to you' - I certainly did. Especially if you are a fan of German Romanticism and Expressionism.
Bruna Tavares (3 years ago)
Beautiful building and great arts exhibitions! Definitely recommend going with more 3 hours for the visit.
Kateřina Princová (3 years ago)
Beautiful gallery with pleasant atmosphere. Great Gerhard Richter.
giovanna cervo (3 years ago)
Visited only because it was free and too cold outside, it was a really huuuge and nice discovery! One of the few in Dresden with English explanations
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