The Albertinum was built between 1884 and 1887 by extending a former armoury, or arsenal, that had been constructed between 1559 and 1563 at the same location. The new building was designed by the regional master builder Carl Adolf Canzler in the Renaissance Revival style to house the royal Collection of Antique and Modern Sculptures. The building was named after the Saxonian King Albert who reigned at the time. In 1889, the Sculpture Collection was moved in and has since remained there.

Besides the Sculpture Collection, the Albertinum has housed the New Masters Gallery (Galerie Neue Meister) in the upper rooms since 1965. It was also the temporary postwar home of the Numismatic Cabinet (Münzkabinett) and the Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe) until the exhibitions were moved to the rebuilt Dresden Castle in 2002 and 2004.

The floods of 2002 necessitated renovating the Albertinum and building a new flood-proof depository. After closing in 2006, the building was finally reopened on June 20, 2010 as a 'house of the modern' with the New Masters Gallery and the Sculpture Collection.

The Albertinum houses the New Masters Gallery (Galerie Neue Meister) and the Sculpture Collection (Skulpturensammlung). The holdings of the two museums, with paintings ranging from Caspar David Friedrich to Ludwig Richterand sculptures from Auguste Rodin to the 21st century, are displayed on three floors in exhibition halls with a modern look.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1884-1887
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia (35 days ago)
Post romantic masters, including Picasso, Kadinsky and Mondrian. Fascinating and thought provoking.
Simon Gershon (53 days ago)
I only visited the 'new masters' gallery but was really impressed with the collection. I am sure you will find more than one painting which 'speaks to you' - I certainly did. Especially if you are a fan of German Romanticism and Expressionism.
Bruna Tavares (2 months ago)
Beautiful building and great arts exhibitions! Definitely recommend going with more 3 hours for the visit.
Kateřina Princová (2 months ago)
Beautiful gallery with pleasant atmosphere. Great Gerhard Richter.
giovanna cervo (3 months ago)
Visited only because it was free and too cold outside, it was a really huuuge and nice discovery! One of the few in Dresden with English explanations
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cesky Sternberk Castle

Ceský Sternberk Castle is an early Gothic castle which was constructed, named and still owned by members of the same family. Today it is a residence that bears a long historical and architectural heritage and represents an attractive tourist destination open to the public. It is considered one of the best preserved Gothic Bohemian castles.

The castle was initially built in 1241 by Zdeslav of Divisov, later called Zdeslav Sternberg. The development of new firearms in the 14th century posed an unexpected threat to the defensibility of the castle. Its 13th century architects hadn't foreseen the danger of long-range firearms and its reinforcement became a necessity. During this period the Ceský Sternberk castle's fortifications were improved through the construction in the north of a three-story tower, which was connected to the castle by a rampart. In 1467 the castle was seized by the royal armies of George of Podébrady. Later, the ruined castle was regained by Sternberk's aristocracy, who, by the turn of the 15th to 16th century, had reconstructed the castle, renewed its defensive system and expanded it with the construction of a new cylindrical tower in the south and the Dungeon in the north. The castle managed to survive the looting of the rebels in 1627, during the Thirty Years' War. With the death of Jan Václav in 1712, the Holicý branch of the Sternberg family died out and its ownership passed to other families, who in 1751 built the lower palace next to the surrounding wall.

The ownership of the castle was returned to the Sternberg family in 1841 when Zdenék of Sternberg from the Konopisté branch of the family bought it. It remained in Sternberg's ownership until 1949 when it was nationalized by the Communist government of the Republic of Czechoslovakia. After the fall of Communism and the Velvet Revolution, in 1992, Ceský Sternberk castle returned to Jirí's son, the count Zdenék Sternberg, the current owner of the castle.

Ceský Sternberk Castle was originally built as a Gothic castle. Eventually it underwent several periods of reconstructions and further fortification and the Gothic architectural features were in parts concealed by the new reconstructions. Especially the interiors of the castle were realized under the Baroque and Rococo styles. In 1760, the master Carlo Brentano performed the elaborate stuccoing and renderings of the halls' interiors. The castle offers a rare collection of 545 copper engravings, depicting the entire history of the Thirty Years' War. Also, historical weapons and hunting trophies are exhibited within the castle's halls.