Zollverein Coal Mine Industrial Complex

Essen, Germany

The Zollverein industrial complex, an UNESCO World Heritage Site, consists of the complete infrastructure of a historical coal-mining site, with some 20th-century buildings of outstanding architectural merit. It constitutes remarkable material evidence of the evolution and decline of an essential industry over the past 150 years.

The Zollverein is an important example of a European primary industry of great economic significance in the 19th and 20th centuries. It consists of the complete installations of a historical coal-mining site: the pits, coking plants, railway lines, pit heaps, miner’s housing and consumer and welfare facilities. The mine is especially noteworthy of the high architectural quality of its buildings of the Modern Movement.

Zollverein XII was created at the end of a phase of political and economic upheaval and change in Germany, which was represented aesthetically in the transition from Expressionism to Cubism and Functionalism. At the same time, Zollverein XII embodies this short economic boom between the two World Wars, which has gone down in history as the 'Roaring Twenties'. Zollverein is also, and by no means least, a monument of industrial history reflecting an era, in which, for the first time, globalisation and the worldwide interdependence of economic factors played a vital part.

The architects Fritz Schupp and Martin Kemmer developed Zollverein XII in the graphic language of the Bauhaus as a group of buildings which combined form and function in a masterly way. 

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Details

Founded: 1847
Category: Industrial sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

L Reed (13 months ago)
Probably would have been able to appreciate the museum if my children were older. My 4 and 1 year old were not impressed. The escalator and walking around the grounds did make for a lovely morning outing.
Adrien Goldszal (13 months ago)
Really interesting place, very eerie especially on days where there are few visitors. The ruhr museum is huge and worth the visit, especially the last floor showing the evolution of coal plants and their impact on the region. Everything is very detailed. Have a stroll in the rest of the park if you have time, there even is a swimming pool !!
SALMAN DELIWALA (2 years ago)
A very Iconic place in Essen one should not miss this place if visiting Essen. The place is very vast lots of things to see around and there is no entry fee. There are few museums located within the premises which are accessible after buying the ticket though the place itself gives some idea about the history. There is a very huge escalator leading to Ruhr museum which again is unique within itself. The nearest public transportation is via Tram station zollverein which is close to the entrance to this building.
Tim Ole (2 years ago)
Very fun experience- part UNESCO world heritage, (small) part lost place. If you’re there please book a tour including a trip to the terrace offering a panoramic view and think about renting a bike at “Revierrad” on the premises to see all the cool places. You can learn lots about the coal industry, the Ruhr-area and much more or visit the Red Dot Design museum to catch an exhibition. There are lots of dining and snacking options as well. One caveat concerns smaller children: only one tiny playground is to be found - so look beforehand if you want to make a stop at the beautiful Kinderburg playground close-by.
Christopher Hoffee (2 years ago)
I can be there for days taking photos...
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