Zollverein Coal Mine Industrial Complex

Essen, Germany

The Zollverein industrial complex, an UNESCO World Heritage Site, consists of the complete infrastructure of a historical coal-mining site, with some 20th-century buildings of outstanding architectural merit. It constitutes remarkable material evidence of the evolution and decline of an essential industry over the past 150 years.

The Zollverein is an important example of a European primary industry of great economic significance in the 19th and 20th centuries. It consists of the complete installations of a historical coal-mining site: the pits, coking plants, railway lines, pit heaps, miner’s housing and consumer and welfare facilities. The mine is especially noteworthy of the high architectural quality of its buildings of the Modern Movement.

Zollverein XII was created at the end of a phase of political and economic upheaval and change in Germany, which was represented aesthetically in the transition from Expressionism to Cubism and Functionalism. At the same time, Zollverein XII embodies this short economic boom between the two World Wars, which has gone down in history as the 'Roaring Twenties'. Zollverein is also, and by no means least, a monument of industrial history reflecting an era, in which, for the first time, globalisation and the worldwide interdependence of economic factors played a vital part.

The architects Fritz Schupp and Martin Kemmer developed Zollverein XII in the graphic language of the Bauhaus as a group of buildings which combined form and function in a masterly way. 

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Details

Founded: 1847
Category: Industrial sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Susanna Borciani (18 months ago)
An old and dismissed mining platform recycled as a cultural and artistic centre of aggregation. The landscape is very peculiar and makes it the perfect location for some industrial photos. The Nature is growing through it and creates an even more spectacular atmosphere. It is also part of UNESCO Heritage. Very recommended.
Balázs Solymossy (18 months ago)
The Zollverein is a huge historical "attraction" over a 1 km2 area. It is inhabited with art installations (Red dot design museum, for example), restaurants and if course industry. It is worth to spend a longer time here and participate on the guided tours.
Mathijs Beaujean (19 months ago)
Beautiful architecture, and both the Ruhr Museum and the Red Dot Museum were excellent. Signs to find your way around might be a tad better.
el cazador Economista (19 months ago)
If you are interested in History visit this place. Interesting insights about industry, life and culture of former times. Straight in the Ruhrpott.
Rainar Rye (20 months ago)
What a place! The buildings are a great example of form meets function. The Ruhr Museum is overwhelming so be sure to allocate more than 2 hours! Do a guided tour as this gives access to the interior of the plant.
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