Broich Castle was originally erected to protect the town of Mülheim from invasion by the the Normans in the late 9th century. It is probably the oldest, still maintained Carolingian fortification in German-speaking Europe. 

The abandoned castle was rebuilt and expanded by the noblemen of Broich in the end of the 11th century. The castle survived a long and eventful history, including bloody feuds, wars, occupation and destruction.

Over 200 years ago, Broich’s most famous guest stayed there -  Luise, Queen of Prussia - as the castle was owned by her grandmother.

Today, an exhibition of the local society for history informs the visitor about these events and explains their meaning for the city Mülheim an der Ruhr. It is also a popular location for weddings, music festivals and other events.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.muelheim-ruhr.de

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

krishna chaitanya kalidindi (3 years ago)
The hotel is in a nice location and one of the person in charge Andreas is very helpful. He was very quick to respond to my queries before I made the booking and throughout. It's a simple hotel with all the basic amenities with a couple of restaurants nearby.
Marcello a (4 years ago)
basic rooms, but clean and above all quiet. Friendly staff and convenient parking. Logistically comfortable.
Luigi Lo Mele (4 years ago)
Top Location
ania łatka (4 years ago)
Nice place for a walk and sightseeing in Muhlheim. Surrounded with nice park area, with good vegetarian restaurant near by.
Janine Kotze (5 years ago)
Beautiful
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