St. Andreas Church

Düsseldorf, Germany

The Church of St. Andreas was constructed between 1622 and 1629 in the South German baroque style. It was originally a Jesuit church and also served as the court church for the Counts palatine of Neuburg. After the dissolution of the Jesuit order in August 1773 it served as a parish church until 2005 when it became the monastery church of the Dominican Order. The building itself is now owned by the city of Düsseldorf.

The church is furnished with stucco by Johannes Kuhn from Strassburg and life-size sculptures of the apostles and of saints of the Society of Jesus.

In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the church was an important center of musical culture in Düsseldorf. The composer Johann Hugo von Wilderer served as its organist. The mausoleum, designed by Venetian architect Simone del Sarto, contains the tombs of several Electors Palatine, including that of Johann Wilhelm. The high altar of the church was destroyed during World War II. The new altar, designed by Ewald Mataré was built in 1960. Paintings by Ernst Deger can be found in the church's two side altars which are dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

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Details

Founded: 1622-1629
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gijo Koyikkara (16 months ago)
Calming atmosphere
Randy Chandra (17 months ago)
Although very modest outside, the interior of the church is beautiful and intricate. It is open for visitors and worshippers alike.
Andrzej Bułeczka (2 years ago)
Beautiful, quite place full of Spirit
Beth Keser (2 years ago)
Beautiful church worth a quick view.
Justin Bunch (2 years ago)
Despite its partial destruction in WW2, the Church of St. Andrew is a remarkable example of the early baroque in Northern Germany. The stucco work is mostly from the early 17th century by Johannes Kuhn from southern Germany. Its a clear transitional style between the Renaissance and the Baroque. But note the Rococo stucco work around the organ and the late Baroque sculptures of the Apostles. The surviving transitional design makes this church a unique example of the spread of new ideas and artistic expression in the lower Rhineland.
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