St. Andreas Church

Düsseldorf, Germany

The Church of St. Andreas was constructed between 1622 and 1629 in the South German baroque style. It was originally a Jesuit church and also served as the court church for the Counts palatine of Neuburg. After the dissolution of the Jesuit order in August 1773 it served as a parish church until 2005 when it became the monastery church of the Dominican Order. The building itself is now owned by the city of Düsseldorf.

The church is furnished with stucco by Johannes Kuhn from Strassburg and life-size sculptures of the apostles and of saints of the Society of Jesus.

In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the church was an important center of musical culture in Düsseldorf. The composer Johann Hugo von Wilderer served as its organist. The mausoleum, designed by Venetian architect Simone del Sarto, contains the tombs of several Electors Palatine, including that of Johann Wilhelm. The high altar of the church was destroyed during World War II. The new altar, designed by Ewald Mataré was built in 1960. Paintings by Ernst Deger can be found in the church's two side altars which are dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

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Details

Founded: 1622-1629
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adventure Team (8 months ago)
Amazing experience I had yesterday visiting this church. The Pastor was cool and pay attention to every visitor there, actually only 40 people allow to enter with an appointment due to Corona.
Magdalena M (16 months ago)
Great looking church, lots sculptures inside. Free organ concert in Sundays
Tammy Donaldson (21 months ago)
Small pretty church right in the Altstadt. Went on a Saturday afternoon. They have volunteers that will give you some great information. Very friendly people. Make sure to go the back in the mausoleum. Flyer's in several languages just to your right inside the door.
Borislav Tzvetanov (2 years ago)
Beautiful.
Gijo Koyikkara (2 years ago)
Calming atmosphere
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