St. Lambertus Church

Düsseldorf, Germany

St. Lambertus Church was built in 1206 and enlarged 1288–1394. The church's spire owes its twisted shape to the use of unseasoned timber when it was rebuilt after a lighting strike in 1815. Inside the church the 15th-century tabernacle and splendid Renaissance memorial of Duke Wilhelm V are worth of seeing.

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Details

Founded: 1206
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Crowd Capital (9 months ago)
The church is part of historical site and also part of the religious culture here. Find out the meaning of the boy with the fish in his hand and you'd be amazed.
Louis Tay (10 months ago)
Beautiful, serene church with impressive architecture, both on the exterior and interior. The statues/figures are highly detailed and intricate.
Randy Chandra (10 months ago)
Located near the Rhine River in the Altstadt area, this church looks rather intimidating from outside. Worth to visit if you are in the area.
Chris Patsatzakis (11 months ago)
Just another catholic church. Worth visiting if you are at the neighborhood. Nothing special.
Kin Sern Ng (2 years ago)
Beautifully maintained and retained interior of a traditional church. Be mindful to maintain yiur silence while inside the building as it's frequented by zealous disciples.
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