Schloß Neuhaus, the former residence of the Prince Bishops of Paderborn, is deemed to be one of the most significant early examples of the Weser-Renaissance architecture. The first mention of Neuhaus dates from 1016. The construction of the Palace commenced in the 13th century and continued to be developed until the 16th century to the four-winged building with its four round corner spires and its moat, as we now know it.

Today, the majority of this complex accommodates a local school. The hall of mirrors is a beautiful venue for concerts, presentations and receptions. From May to October the Schloßsommer (Summer in the Palace) programme provides numerous events in the gardens.

Adjacent to the Baroque gardens are 42 hectares of parkland is a popular destination with museums, restaurants, footpaths, playgrounds etc. The exhibition in the museum presents the natural characteristics of the Paderborner Land. It provides information on the geographic position, geology, typical habitats, fauna and flora and a journey through the ages of the earth, very comprehensively and in a most interesting manner. The museum has a special treat for the children, the ‘Kids’ Museum’.

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Details

Founded: 1257
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sephora Onno (18 months ago)
We came specially to enjoy the garden, but it was closed for renovation. But the castle is also nice. We paid 2€ (student price) for the museum, and it was ok.
Maria Rammstein (19 months ago)
Beautifull, great restaurant too !!
Ammarah Masroor (19 months ago)
Went to this place a week ago with my mother, didn't know that it's a school actually. Absolutely peaceful place.
Mohsen Z (21 months ago)
I would highly recommend when ever u r in Paderboring. Nice place to chill
James Cooper (2 years ago)
Stunning stately home and gardens. Enjoyable to walk around. We visited when there was a street food festival, and a wedding. Everything was hugely over priced, averaging 7 or 8 euros for burgers, burger sized sandwiches, hot dogs, Japanese, crepes, did all look nice though. The bicycle coffee bloke was only thing reasonable, and really top quality, kind service. Thank you to them
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