Vischering Castle is a typical moated castle in the Münster region. It consists of outer defensive courtyard, defensive gateways, moat, drawbridge, main building and chapel. The sandstone walls, the red tile roofs as well as their reflection in the moat provide many harmonious views from the wooded surroundings.

Vischering Castle was built by Bischop Gerhard von der Mark. It became the seat of the Vischering Family. The moat is constantly replenished by a side-arm of the River Stever. The outer defensive courtyard contains the business and farm buildings. The main building is a horseshoe-shaped three-story structure with heavy outer wall. Its inner courtyard is closed off by the chapel and a lower defense wall. A castle keep is missing, having been removed during Renaissance renovations. Fire destroyed the castle in 1521. Rebuilding took place on the existing foundation. Windows and the addition of a large bay made the castle more liveable but diminished its defensive character. The whole site however retains the character of a feudal age moated castle. Damage from air attack during World War II was minor.

Vischering Castle houses the Münsterlandmuseum, an exhibit on knighthood for children, as well as a cafe-restaurant. It serves as a cultural center for Kreis Coesfeld. Visiting hours are provided in the first link below. Viewing the outside is possible at all times. The second link provides a more detailed chronology of the castle in German .

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Margrét Einarsdóttir Long (15 months ago)
A very inspiring museum wirh intresting design solutions. Staff very helpful.
Patrick H (2 years ago)
Beautiful water castle. There is a nice path around it, from which you get different views. There really isn't that much to see inside. Save your ticket money for some of the other castles nearby.
Larry Wood II (2 years ago)
A nice quant little castle. I enjoyed learning from its history. I would recommend this to travellers that don't like the hustle and bustle of the larger and more tourist filled places.
Bjorn Troch (2 years ago)
Fairy tale like castle that's totally worth a visit if you're in the neighbourhood.
Frank Wils (3 years ago)
Beautiful watercastle. Inside is a small museum, which is also worth seeing. The terrace is good, sometimes there is also a baker selling artisinal really good fresh bread.
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