Monschau Castle

Monschau, Germany

Monschau Castle is first recorded in 1217 as castrum in Munjoje by Archbishop Engelbert I of Cologne. It was expanded in the middle of the 14th century into a fortress for the counts of Jülich and equipped with mighty ring walls and wall walks. In 1543 troops of Emperor Charles V besieged the site with heavy guns, captured it and plundered it together with the town of Monschau.

In the early 19th century the French administration declared the castle to be state property and sold it to a private buyer who had the roofs removed in 1836 and 1837 in order to avoid building tax. As a result, the castle fell into ruins until, in the early 20th century, the government of the Rhine province secured and repaired it. After the First World War a youth hostel was opened in the west wing. So Monschau Castle survived as a 'youth castle' (Jugendburg).

Within sight of the castle, on the other side of town, is another fortification, the Haller. It is disputed as to whether it was an outpost of the castle, a detached watchtower or the remains of an older castle site.

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Details

Founded: c. 1217
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Slava Lysov (16 months ago)
Der Weg ist weit aber es lohnt sich. Super Aussicht! )
Lutz Berger (16 months ago)
Ein Traum. Monschau muss man gesehen haben!
Ke Ja 2509 (17 months ago)
Sehr schöne Ruine mit einem fantastischen Ausblick über Monschau. Definitiv den Aufstieg wert.
Jean-Pierre Seitz (19 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne Burg die zum Rest der Stadt passt. Wirklich ein schönes Fleckchen und nicht weit von den Ballungszentren entfernt. Eine Fahrt nach Monschau lohnt sich auf alle Fälle.
Raisa Sereda (2 years ago)
Cool castle
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