Monschau Castle

Monschau, Germany

Monschau Castle is first recorded in 1217 as castrum in Munjoje by Archbishop Engelbert I of Cologne. It was expanded in the middle of the 14th century into a fortress for the counts of Jülich and equipped with mighty ring walls and wall walks. In 1543 troops of Emperor Charles V besieged the site with heavy guns, captured it and plundered it together with the town of Monschau.

In the early 19th century the French administration declared the castle to be state property and sold it to a private buyer who had the roofs removed in 1836 and 1837 in order to avoid building tax. As a result, the castle fell into ruins until, in the early 20th century, the government of the Rhine province secured and repaired it. After the First World War a youth hostel was opened in the west wing. So Monschau Castle survived as a 'youth castle' (Jugendburg).

Within sight of the castle, on the other side of town, is another fortification, the Haller. It is disputed as to whether it was an outpost of the castle, a detached watchtower or the remains of an older castle site.

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Details

Founded: c. 1217
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shikhar Singh (13 months ago)
The castle is nice. But a small one. Monschau city is better for visiting and spending time. And maybe to have brunch.
Jeremy H. (13 months ago)
Will be a beautiful castle with a city overlook once construction is done. It may be done by the end of Autumn. Highly recommend this location for an overnight stop or a weekend stay. Near the Belgium border and Eiffel National Park.
Sheila García (13 months ago)
Definitely in the TOP of bucket list places to visit. There’s just so many viewpoints from where to capture the city (although best one is not from its castle) and some many alleys in which to get lost. Full of restaurants and coffee places, even if it is a popular destination, prices are not crazy. It was not very crowded, but traveling during covid times may help.
Keith Phillips (14 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful place to visit!
Sunkara Maneesha (MANEE SUNKARA) (2 years ago)
If you have a gang and u need a place to hang out ? Then u can choose this town. Its a different town from others and has some individual style as some sort of Belgium's.Hiking gives u satisfaction and can have some snaps over there.
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