Vosakou Monastery

Mylopótamos, Greece

According to various historical sources, Vosakou monastery was in continuous use from the early 17th century until 1960, when the last of its monks died. In April 1676, Vossakos became a Patriarchical monastery (i.e. stauropegic), proclaimed by an act of Ecumenical Patriarch Parthenius IV. The monastery played an important role in the greater area of Mylopotamos and owned many pieces of land as well as establishments in the nearby villages of Sisses, Garazo and Dafnedes. It also contributed to the Greek Revolution of Independence in 1821 and the Cretan Revolution of 1866. This involvement resulted in the monastery being partially destroyed by the Turks. Later in the 19th century, the monastery was rebuilt through significant construction activities. The current main church (katholikon) was built in 1855, replacing an earlier one dating from the 14th and 15th centuries.

The monastic complex is arranged in three wings around the main church which is situated on the east side of the central yard. It is a single-aisled, vaulted church that is characterized by simple artistic features. A fountain built in 1673 is located near the main church. The monastery's water supply system is complemented by two water-cisterns, collecting the water draining from the roofs with a system of pipes. The east wing of the monastery is determined by its monumental gate of 1669 and two small rooms. The south and west wings comprise the dining hall, kitchen, honey and wax workshops and the raki distillery. An open-air wine-press is located in the central wing.

After being abandoned for over 40 years, the monastery was reinstated in 1998. An extensive restoration project was undertaken by the 28th Ephorate of Byzantine Antiquities, funded by the municipality of Kouloukonas, the Region of Crete and the monastery itself. Today, about two thirds of the originally derelict buildings have been restored and works are still under way.

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Details

Founded: 1676
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Fecik (13 months ago)
Nice and peaceful place. Due to Covid this year the shop was closed but it still was a nice place to visit.
Michiel De Ruijter (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to go. The gardens and flowers are very nice and the shop has some local products. The road to the Monastery is a great one to drive.
Ioannis Berdiakis (3 years ago)
Οργάνωση, καθαριότητα.....αξίζουν συγχαρητήρια!
George Aerakis (3 years ago)
Η διαδρομή φανταστική. Ο ωραίος Μυλοπόταμος! Μοναστήρι υπέροχο. Φιλόξενοι άνθρωποι.
Unknow User (3 years ago)
Relaxing location. Really beautiful there. Also some friendly cats and dogs. If you like the sound of silence it will be the right destination for you!
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