Founded by monks from the Order of Chalais, the Valbonne church was built between 1199 and 1230. It features minimalist architectural lines, typical of the order which reached its peak at this moment, before its decline and disappearance in 1303.

This was a small abbey, housing a maximum of 30 monks. The simple church, now a parish church, can be visited, as well as the monastery buildings, which are very well preserved, including a sacristy, chapter house, refectory, kitchen and workshop. The beautifully minimalist cloister, where remnants of the tiled roof can still be seen, also houses the monks' dormitories with narrow windows on the upper floor.

Restored in the 1970s, the image of the church was changed during the 19th century when the Romanesque southern windows were enlarged. On the northern wall, a chapel dedicated to the White Penitents was opened in the 17th century.

The second floor of the cloister houses a museum showcasing the heritage of Valbonne. Traditional jobs and domestic life are explained here.

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Details

Founded: 1199-1230
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.seecannes.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephane Guerrero (3 years ago)
Très beau.
Charlotte Olivier (3 years ago)
Joli et simple abbaye. Rien de bien intéressant ni même de mis en valeur. Dans la cours il y a des panneaux explicatifs. Peut être en prévision d'ouvertures touristiques !!!
Laetitia Zolochewski (3 years ago)
A visiter tres Jolie creche a Noel bravo pour ce magnifique travail
gilles bour (4 years ago)
Très belle , il y a parfois des exposition dans une salle a gauche . Le village est trés beau
Jawed Ahmed (5 years ago)
Great place and of historic importance too..
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