Nice Cathedral

Nice, France

Nice Cathedral was built between 1650 and 1699, the year of its consecration. It is dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary and Saint Reparata.

On the site, the first cathedral was consecrated in 1049. In 1060, relics belonging to St. Reparate (For whom the current cathedral is named) arrived in the city of Nice. By the year 1075 there was construction of a chapel dedicated to St. Reparate. During the later half of the twelfth century, the chapel became the priory of the abbey of Saint-Pons.

The next church on the site was built in the early 13th century on land belonging to the Abbey of St. Pons and became a parish church in 1246.

During the first half of the 16th century a series of acts gradually effected the transfer of the seat of the bishops of Nice from Cimiez Cathedral on the hill of the castle overlooking the city to the church of Saint Reparata which in 1590, after an official ceremony presided over by the then bishop, Luigi Pallavicini, and in the presence of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, was recognised as a chiesa-cattedrale.

However, in 1649, judging the building too small, bishop Didier Palletis commissioned the architect Jean-André Guibert to produce a structure more in keeping with the importance of the city. 1650 to 1685, The construction of a new cathedral (The current main building) occurs during this time. In 1699 the new cathedral is officially consecrated but the construction is an ongoing process.

From 1731 to 1759 the now widely recognized bell tower is built. 1900 marked the most recent addition to the cathedral with the construction of new side chapels which replaced the former heavy baroque ornamentation. The cathedral was declared a minor basilica on 27 May 1949.

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Address

Place Rossetti 3, Nice, France
See all sites in Nice

Details

Founded: 1650-1699
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

enna ibowi (7 months ago)
So sumptuous, as if offering the whole soul to God and creativity.
Rick Scadlock (9 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral in old Town Nice. The lighting is very well thought out. There was light music playing that really added to the atmosphere as well. I stayed for a good 45 minutes and enjoyed the peacefulness.
David DuBois (10 months ago)
I always visit a local cathedral when visiting any European city. Soo much history and time for reflection and gratitude.
Francis Larsson (13 months ago)
Beautiful church. We randomly arrived a few minutes before the Sunday mass, while the choir was rehearsing. The priest leading the choir had a lovely voice and charisma and we decided to stay for the duration of the mass. A great and beautiful experience, from the music, tradition and overall look at the church. Highly recommended, even if only for a visit to the church itself.
Voichita Todor (2 years ago)
Really feeling God's presence. Quote old and well preserved.
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