Our Lady of the Assumption Church

Saint-Tropez, France

The Italian Baroque-style Our Lady of the Assumption Church topped by a bell tower was built in 1784. It is one of the most recognisable sights in Saint-Tropez, with its bright ochre and earthy sienna coloured bell tower.

This building replaced an older 16th-century church which became unstable when the current chapel was erected. There had been an earlier 11th-century religious construction on this same site, destroyed during Queen Jeanne's succession wars.

Inside, you can admire statues and wood carvings dating back to the early 19th century, along with the bust of Saint Tropez, which is paraded through the streets every year during the famous 'Bravades' celebration. 

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Details

Founded: 1784
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

www.seesainttropez.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mr PCH (6 months ago)
Candle shop next to it sells replica candles which have been pictured around the world, even outer space!
Luc016 (12 months ago)
Nice church from outside, the opening times are very disappointing though. You cannot go in when you want.
Joseph Allen (2 years ago)
Beautiful, historic, and picturesque.
Julien Chabe (2 years ago)
A church like most in the South of France. Nothing special.
Avi Rosentzweig (2 years ago)
Amaizing...
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