Saint Nicholas Cathedral

Monaco, Monaco

Saint Nicholas Cathedral (officially Cathédrale Notre-Dame-Immaculée) is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Monaco, where many of the Grimaldis were buried, including Grace Kelly and more recently, Rainier III.

The cathedral was built in 1875-1903 and consecrated in 1911, and is on the site of the first parish church in Monaco built in 1252 and dedicated to St. Nicholas. Of note are the retable (circa 1500) to the right of the transept, the Great Altar and the Episcopal throne in white Carrara marble.

Pontifical services take place on the major religious festivals such as the Feast of Sainte Dévote (27 January) and the National holiday (19 November). On feast days and during religious music concerts, one can hear the magnificent four-keyboard organ, inaugurated in 1976.

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Address

Rue de l'Eglise, Monaco, Monaco
See all sites in Monaco

Details

Founded: 1875-1903
Category: Religious sites in Monaco

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paranormal Resident (3 months ago)
Free to enter just remember the dress code no hate or swim clothing be respectful and enjoy the beauty
Jack (8 months ago)
Amazing building and a significant part of Monaco's history
Dieter Anton Berger (9 months ago)
Nice Cathedral, worth to stop for a visit.
Mathias Forrisdahl (11 months ago)
Gorgeous with great views over the sea..
Andreas Evans (16 months ago)
Spectacular cathedral with breathtaking stained glass and vaulted ceilings. A MUST visit when on the Rock.
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