Saint Nicholas Cathedral

Monaco, Monaco

Saint Nicholas Cathedral (officially Cathédrale Notre-Dame-Immaculée) is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Monaco, where many of the Grimaldis were buried, including Grace Kelly and more recently, Rainier III.

The cathedral was built in 1875-1903 and consecrated in 1911, and is on the site of the first parish church in Monaco built in 1252 and dedicated to St. Nicholas. Of note are the retable (circa 1500) to the right of the transept, the Great Altar and the Episcopal throne in white Carrara marble.

Pontifical services take place on the major religious festivals such as the Feast of Sainte Dévote (27 January) and the National holiday (19 November). On feast days and during religious music concerts, one can hear the magnificent four-keyboard organ, inaugurated in 1976.

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Address

Rue de l'Eglise, Monaco, Monaco
See all sites in Monaco

Details

Founded: 1875-1903
Category: Religious sites in Monaco

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrick Werner (19 months ago)
True admirer of Grace. Had to go there. Was impressed. Come early to avoid huge crowds.
Ess Ebraheem (20 months ago)
Lovely architecture. Would be great to see it used for worshiping the one true God. One day.
Tom Tackman (21 months ago)
Impressive cathredal and One of Monacos top sights. Not to miss if visiting.
Joanne Hendrickson (22 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral. Free to enter. Grace Kelly is buried here, left of the alter (her name was originally Patricia so the grave is listed with that name instead). Very pleasant and helpful people working inside. Photos allowed (just no flash photography).
Terence Lee (22 months ago)
Can't think of too many reasons why you shouldn't visit this Cathedral as it is on the way to the Oceanographic Museum from the Prince's Palace. Free to view the inside as well and appreciate it's brilliance.
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