Arlon Archaeological Museum

Arlon, Belgium

The Gallo-Roman Lapidary Gallery is the largest of its kind in Belgium, with the best-quality artefacts. It contains more than 425 sculptures from funerary monuments and civic buildings. The exhibits include around sixty large fragments sculpted on several sides, plus shards of pottery and other discoveries which paint a picture of daily life during the Gallo-Roman era. The museum’s fascinating Frankish gallery displays the contents of the tombs of Merovingian dignitaries (contemporaries of King Clovis) found in Arlon, including gold jewellery, Damascus steel swords, vases and coffins. Guidebook and explanatory panels in English. Guided tours in English available on request.

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Details

Founded: 1847
Category: Museums in Belgium

More Information

www.arlon-tourisme.be

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sven Berckmoes (10 months ago)
Currently under renovation so a little less to see.
Kevin Detienne (11 months ago)
Great archaeological museum.
Luc Luppens (13 months ago)
Small ... but nice .. original finds ?
Maïté Devigne (14 months ago)
Lots of room on display, very pleasant.
Not Just Another Book (3 years ago)
For a small museum it packed a punch in its superb exhibits
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