Durbuy Castle

Durbuy, Belgium

In medieval times Durbuy was an important centre of commerce and industry. In 1331, the town was elevated to the rank of city by John I, Count of Luxemburg, and King of Bohemia. At the heart of Durbuy is this fairly modest riverside castle that dates from 1756, the medieval original having been destroyed under Louis XIV of France.

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Details

Founded: 1756
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

La Belgique insolite (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle in the center of Durbuy!
Stefan Bohlin (4 years ago)
Lovely little village
Melissa Brackx (4 years ago)
Beautiful city. Lovely for a day out
Karin Galle (5 years ago)
Great hospitality, great amenities, great views, serene nature.
Marc van Kan (5 years ago)
Beautiful authentic castle in the heart of a pitoresque environment in the self claimed “smallest city in the world”. A visit to Durbuy itself is perfect for a few hours if you stick to only walking a round through town and having a breakfast/lunch/dinner. Lots of physical activities like canoing and/or mountainbiking are possible and even recommended in the surrounding area.
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