In medieval times Durbuy was an important centre of commerce and industry. In 1331, the town was elevated to the rank of city by John I, Count of Luxemburg, and King of Bohemia. At the heart of Durbuy is this fairly modest riverside castle that dates from 1756, the medieval original having been destroyed under Louis XIV of France.

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Founded: 1756
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

La Belgique insolite (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle in the center of Durbuy!
Stefan Bohlin (2 years ago)
Lovely little village
Melissa Brackx (2 years ago)
Beautiful city. Lovely for a day out
Karin Galle (3 years ago)
Great hospitality, great amenities, great views, serene nature.
Marc van Kan (3 years ago)
Beautiful authentic castle in the heart of a pitoresque environment in the self claimed “smallest city in the world”. A visit to Durbuy itself is perfect for a few hours if you stick to only walking a round through town and having a breakfast/lunch/dinner. Lots of physical activities like canoing and/or mountainbiking are possible and even recommended in the surrounding area.
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Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.