In medieval times Durbuy was an important centre of commerce and industry. In 1331, the town was elevated to the rank of city by John I, Count of Luxemburg, and King of Bohemia. At the heart of Durbuy is this fairly modest riverside castle that dates from 1756, the medieval original having been destroyed under Louis XIV of France.

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Founded: 1756
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

La Belgique insolite (9 months ago)
Beautiful castle in the center of Durbuy!
Stefan Bohlin (11 months ago)
Lovely little village
Melissa Brackx (15 months ago)
Beautiful city. Lovely for a day out
Karin Galle (2 years ago)
Great hospitality, great amenities, great views, serene nature.
Marc van Kan (2 years ago)
Beautiful authentic castle in the heart of a pitoresque environment in the self claimed “smallest city in the world”. A visit to Durbuy itself is perfect for a few hours if you stick to only walking a round through town and having a breakfast/lunch/dinner. Lots of physical activities like canoing and/or mountainbiking are possible and even recommended in the surrounding area.
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Antiquarium

Situated in the basement of Metropol Parasol, Antiquarium is a modern, well-presented archaeological museum with sections of ruins visible through glass partitions, and underfoot along walkways.

These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).