Montquintin Castle

Rouvroy, Belgium

Montquintin Castle was probably originally designed to defend the southern border of the counts of Chiny. It was built in the 11th century by order of Louis II, Count of Chiny (born 1025). Over the centuries the castle has undergone many changes. The central part was rebuilt the 18th centuryt by the Bishop of Hontheim, last owner. In 1869 a fire destroyed the castle. The basement includes a vaulted cellar, which is very well preserved.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filipe Landerdahl Albanio (16 months ago)
Nice castle ruins, easy to arrive, close to the main roads
Dries Cools (2 years ago)
Cool ruin.
Césped artificial VERDECO (3 years ago)
From my childness
Didier Boseret (3 years ago)
Château en ruine. Je ne sais pas si il est en restauration. Si on passe par là ça vaut la peine de s'arrêter 5 minutes, mais le tour est très vite fait. Wikipedia : Le château de Montquintin est un ancien château fort féodal situé dans le village belge de Montquintin en province de Luxembourg et Lorraine gaumaise. Les ruines, sises sur une butte témoin dominant la vallée du Ton, font actuellement l'objet d'un programme de restauration.
Marc Durant (4 years ago)
Sympa et joli
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