Château de Saint-Sauveur

Rocbaron, France

On a wooded hilltop just southeast of Rocbaron village are the ruins of Château de Saint-Sauveur. A short hike up from the village visits the ruins and gives you a magnificent view across the land.

About 10 minutes up the trail are the ruins of the ancient chapel. Really just the stone walls of the old building sitting in the trees at the edge of a small clearing. Interesting, but the real ruins are another 10-15 minutes up to the peak.

At the extreme top of the hill sit the stone ruins of 12th-century Saint Sauveur Castle. Enough of the castle walls remain on the eagles-nest site to give a Medieval feeling about it. Across the hills to the northeast, the castle ruins of Forcalqueiret are clearly visible.

Written history of the castle is rather scarce. Study of the stone defenses indicates 11th century, and possibly 10th century. The story of the castle's demise is also verbal and variable. One theory is that the castle was destroyed during local wars. Another, possibly more plausible, is that the isolated site was abandoned for the newer and more accessible castle of Forcalqueiret.

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Rocbaron, France
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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.beyond.fr

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Franck Olivieri (5 months ago)
Très belle vue
Ann Tykaa (5 months ago)
Moi, j'adore ce genre de lieux donc je sur note certainement. J'ai apprécié l'effet miroir de la mer au loin et le paysage forcément.
Loïc Web (5 months ago)
Balade facile. Stationnement facile. Ne convient pas aux poussettes, mais enfants 4/5 ans sans problèmes. Belle vue c'est à faire mais c'est quand même pas extraordinaire. Il reste très peu de ruines.
Willy (7 months ago)
Promenade sympathique calme et belle vue
Michel Mercadier (8 months ago)
Après une petite grimpette de 3/4h on arrive au sommet d'une petite montagne d'où l'on a une vue superbe de 360°.
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