Collobrieres Monastery

Collobrieres, France

La Chartreuse de la Verne, Carthusian monastery in Collobrieres, was built in 1174, however in 1264 and 1271 it was burned down. It wasn't until the sixteenth century that the present chapel and the great south gate were built.

The current Chartreuse is a lovely and imposing set of buildings, completely isolated in a hilly forest of pine, oak and chestnut, overlooking the artificial lake, Lac de la Verne.

The drive up to the monastery is a beautiful scenic trip. A community of nuns still lives in the building, making ceramics and other crafts for sale at their shop.

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Details

Founded: 1174
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.seeprovence.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marie-B CDA (10 months ago)
What a quiet and nice place to visit: a hidden jewel.
Edward Hallett (2 years ago)
The monastery is closed, as is the road to get there (barriered off). Would be good if they could put the info up on the website to save a wasted journey.
Joaquín Oyarzún Ried (2 years ago)
Beautiful lonely place. It is a must.
JC Z (3 years ago)
This is XII century monastery of l’Ordre de Chartre, called Chartreuse de La Verne, which looks like an immense medieval fortress, built on the top of rocky mountain, wonderful views, roads to the site are narrow mountainous roads, about 30 minutes from the nearest town Collobriere.
Eric Pariselle (3 years ago)
Une petite route qui nous emmène au coeur des forêts de Provence, magnifique et qui se termine sur une vue superbe du monastère. Un monastère très bien restauré. Un plaisir des yeux et un grand moment de spiritualité. A voir absolument.
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