Collobrieres Monastery

Collobrieres, France

La Chartreuse de la Verne, Carthusian monastery in Collobrieres, was built in 1174, however in 1264 and 1271 it was burned down. It wasn't until the sixteenth century that the present chapel and the great south gate were built.

The current Chartreuse is a lovely and imposing set of buildings, completely isolated in a hilly forest of pine, oak and chestnut, overlooking the artificial lake, Lac de la Verne.

The drive up to the monastery is a beautiful scenic trip. A community of nuns still lives in the building, making ceramics and other crafts for sale at their shop.

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Details

Founded: 1174
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.seeprovence.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Pariselle (2 years ago)
Une petite route qui nous emmène au coeur des forêts de Provence, magnifique et qui se termine sur une vue superbe du monastère. Un monastère très bien restauré. Un plaisir des yeux et un grand moment de spiritualité. A voir absolument.
Gerson Peres (2 years ago)
Lieu en pleine nature. L'idéal pour une visite culturelle et même cultuelle. Il y a beaucoup de chemin pour faire des balades aux alentours. Les balades peuvent être de niveau plus facile ou plus difficiles. C'est un lieu agréable pour une sortie en famille. Il y a un parking sur place.
Pascal Messin (3 years ago)
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Scott Shubert (4 years ago)
Amazing place. Must see.
Ralf Schernewski (5 years ago)
Nice monasterium. Very friendly person.
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