Collobrieres Monastery

Collobrieres, France

La Chartreuse de la Verne, Carthusian monastery in Collobrieres, was built in 1174, however in 1264 and 1271 it was burned down. It wasn't until the sixteenth century that the present chapel and the great south gate were built.

The current Chartreuse is a lovely and imposing set of buildings, completely isolated in a hilly forest of pine, oak and chestnut, overlooking the artificial lake, Lac de la Verne.

The drive up to the monastery is a beautiful scenic trip. A community of nuns still lives in the building, making ceramics and other crafts for sale at their shop.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1174
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.seeprovence.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marie-B CDA (2 years ago)
What a quiet and nice place to visit: a hidden jewel.
Edward Hallett (3 years ago)
The monastery is closed, as is the road to get there (barriered off). Would be good if they could put the info up on the website to save a wasted journey.
Joaquín Oyarzún Ried (3 years ago)
Beautiful lonely place. It is a must.
JC Z (4 years ago)
This is XII century monastery of l’Ordre de Chartre, called Chartreuse de La Verne, which looks like an immense medieval fortress, built on the top of rocky mountain, wonderful views, roads to the site are narrow mountainous roads, about 30 minutes from the nearest town Collobriere.
Eric Pariselle (4 years ago)
Une petite route qui nous emmène au coeur des forêts de Provence, magnifique et qui se termine sur une vue superbe du monastère. Un monastère très bien restauré. Un plaisir des yeux et un grand moment de spiritualité. A voir absolument.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.