La Tour-de-Peilz Castle

La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland

Built in the 13th century by Pierre de Savoie, the castle of La Tour-de-Peilz served as a fortress and refuge, as an observation post of traffic along lake Geneva, and as a customs post.

In 1476, during the Burgundy wars, it was heavily damaged. It was nearly three centuries later, that in 1747 the French officer Jean Grésier purchased and transformed the building. It remained private property until 1979, when the city of La Tour-de-Peilz purchased it, after a public vote.

Both towers, the walls, the ramparts and the moat were put under a preservation order as a historical monument in 1973. In 1987 the Swiss Museum of Games was inaugurated on the 1st and 2nd floors. The halls on the ground-floor are put at public disposal for different events.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

www.lausanne-tourisme.ch

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas A (5 months ago)
(see tips at the bottom) An interesting museum to learn about various games. The biggest draw would be that quite a number of games here are playable. The narration and flow can be improved, e.g. by explaining the history of games and arranging them in chronological order, or organizing by certain other logical narration. Tips: - plan to spend about 1 hour or so. - more suitable for mid-primary school age, or older
Mojgan Khamsy (5 months ago)
Beautiful outside terrasse en front of lake
Kalle Kormi (6 months ago)
A fascinating journey through the history of games from the ancient times to the contemporary.
Ramin Hashemi (6 months ago)
Now owed but the region is awesome for a walk.
Vikram Mehta (15 months ago)
Great for both kids and adults. History of games including many games available to play for free or a small fee. Spent 1-1.5 hours here. Entry currently free of cost due to Coronavirus slowdown
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