La Tour-de-Peilz Castle

La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland

Built in the 13th century by Pierre de Savoie, the castle of La Tour-de-Peilz served as a fortress and refuge, as an observation post of traffic along lake Geneva, and as a customs post.

In 1476, during the Burgundy wars, it was heavily damaged. It was nearly three centuries later, that in 1747 the French officer Jean Grésier purchased and transformed the building. It remained private property until 1979, when the city of La Tour-de-Peilz purchased it, after a public vote.

Both towers, the walls, the ramparts and the moat were put under a preservation order as a historical monument in 1973. In 1987 the Swiss Museum of Games was inaugurated on the 1st and 2nd floors. The halls on the ground-floor are put at public disposal for different events.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

www.lausanne-tourisme.ch

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

BudapestBears Janos (6 months ago)
Check it out if you are in the region. The special exhibit was very good.
Jeremy Boulat (7 months ago)
Relatively pricey I would visit again with more time on my hands. I arrived late in the day, and so I had to rush through the museum. The first floor was great, but the audio guide did not work. The second floor was alright, relatively boring as it focused all on one game.
Sarah Flanders (11 months ago)
It's small but if you like games it's a treat. And the chateau has a pleasant casual courtyard restaurant.
Tara O'Brien (11 months ago)
I really like this museum...but I also really like games! This museum is situated in an old castle on a beautiful viewpoint in Vevey by the lake. It's worth visiting, if only for the view. The museum takes up three floors, and so there are stairs. There is an elevator for wheelchairs and strollers. The strollers are not permitted in the museum so bring a baby carrier. The museum explains the histories of different games, has lots of games for visitors to learn and play, and has game rooms on two floors. We played several of the games from Mancala, to darts, to the pin ball table. The shop has lots of games to buy and take home. So, if you are looking for a particular game, they may sell it here. They carry French language versions of games only. Overall, great museum and especially worth visiting with children eight and up who can enjoy playing all the games.
Gustav Brink (12 months ago)
Interesting exhibit of older games, but very few of the games if the last 20 odd years are featured. May not take photographs in the museum either.
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