Lausanne Cathedral

Lausanne, Switzerland

Construction of the Lausanne Cathedral began in 1170. Twenty years later another master mason restarted construction until 1215. Finally a third engineer, Jean Cotereel, completed the majority of the existing cathedral including a porch, and two towers, one of which is the current day belfry. The other tower was never completed. The cathedral was consecrated and dedicated to Our Lady in 1275 by Pope Gregory X, Rudolph of Habsburg, and the bishop of Lausanne at the time, Guillaume of Champvent. The medieval architect Villard de Honnecourt drew the rose window of the south transept in his sketchbook in 1270.

The Protestant Reformation, a movement which came from Zurich, significantly affected the Cathedral. In 1536 a new liturgical area was added to the nave and the colourful decorations inside the Cathedral were covered over. Other major restorations occurred later in the 18th and 19th century which were directed by the great French architect, Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc.

During the 20th century major restorations occurred to restore the painted interior decorations as well as to restore a painted portal on the South side of the Cathedral. New organs were installed in 2003.

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Details

Founded: 1170-1275
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paka Buraka (3 months ago)
Iconic cathedral with amazing view from the top of bell tower. Strict and interesting interior without pointless pomp of catholic churches.
Rohit Sahgal (3 months ago)
Sits on top of Lausanne and oversees the gorgeous lakeview and city. There's a nice city museum right next door.
Nicola Robinson (4 months ago)
Really beautiful cathedral. I would highly recommend going to visit you also have a great platform to view the whole city. If you also have time you can have a picnic on the grass/ benches available.
alex (4 months ago)
Wonderful building! Always so calm and a delight to the eyes. Perfect place to cool down in the summer and have a mindful moment all by yourself. They often host classical and religious music events. Must see.
Abel Gray (7 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral full of history. It is very well preserved, and during some renovations they uncovered some beautiful colors that were not expected. The stained glass windows are quite vivid, and the organ towers over the inside. For a small fee you can climb the tower to the top of the cathedral for an amazing view over the city and the larger area in general. At the top you can get up close and personal with the bells.
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