On his death, Gabriel de Rumine, son of Russian nobility, left the city of Lausanne 1.5 million Swiss Francs to erect a building for the use of the public. Building began in 1892 according to the design of the Lyonnais architect Gaspard André. The building was inaugurated on the 3 November 1902, although building work continued until 1904.

On 24 July 1923, the Treaty of Lausanne was signed in Palais de Rumine.

It housed facilities such as the library of the University of Lausanne, and scientific and artistic collections belonging to the Canton of Vaud. In the 1980s, the university moved to its current location by Lake Geneva due to lack of space, and the Palais was restructured.

The building currently hosts one of the three sites of the Cantonal and University Library of Lausanne. Additionally, it contains several museums like Musée cantonal des beaux-arts (Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts), Musée cantonal d'archéologie et d'histoire (Cantonal Museum of Archeology and History) and Musée monétaire cantonal (Cantonal Museum of Money).

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Details

Founded: 1892-1904
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nir Aviv Shapir (18 months ago)
The building itself actually looks like a palace... The inside as well and each exhibition is better than its predecessor
三根彩美 (2 years ago)
It’s really worth to visit
Tara O'Brien (2 years ago)
A pretty spot in central Lausanne with a museum inside. The museum sometimes has special exhibits so it's good to look up the museum online and see what's on. The museum had an odd layout so make sure to grab a map. It'll come in handy.
Michael Bills (2 years ago)
A very classic European style museum. A great value (it's free!), housed in a beautiful historical building. I didn't necessarily see anything I haven't seen before in other museums, but it was still a good way to pass a few hours in Lausanne.
Naveen Yellambalse (2 years ago)
Amazing museums in a palace setting. They have 4 to 5 different museums here. The entry is free to all! It is typically a 2h visit around all the museums, but can be extended longer if a certain part of the museum is of more interest.
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