Lausanne Historical Museum

Lausanne, Switzerland

Housed in the bishop’s palace, the oldest parts of which date back to the 11th century, Lausanne Historical Museum has since 1918 been telling the story of the city of Lausanne and the economic, social and urban changes it has experienced.

In its permanent exhibition, it tells the story of Lausanne, from its prehistoric origins through to the economic, social and urban revolutions of the 19th century.

The collections boast a wealth of iconographic exhibits presenting the city, its inhabitants and their ways of life, including oil paintings, engravings, maps, posters and photographs, the first plates of which date back from the time of the pioneers in 1840. These are complemented by thousands of objects, including pewter, costumes, pottery, furniture and tools, with an outstanding selection of pieces of Lausanne silverware taking pride of place.

The most amazing item is surely the incredible model representing 17th century Lausanne on a 1/200 scale. It is based on a 1638 map made from a high view point and the first cadastral map of 1723.

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