Lausanne Historical Museum

Lausanne, Switzerland

Housed in the bishop’s palace, the oldest parts of which date back to the 11th century, Lausanne Historical Museum has since 1918 been telling the story of the city of Lausanne and the economic, social and urban changes it has experienced.

In its permanent exhibition, it tells the story of Lausanne, from its prehistoric origins through to the economic, social and urban revolutions of the 19th century.

The collections boast a wealth of iconographic exhibits presenting the city, its inhabitants and their ways of life, including oil paintings, engravings, maps, posters and photographs, the first plates of which date back from the time of the pioneers in 1840. These are complemented by thousands of objects, including pewter, costumes, pottery, furniture and tools, with an outstanding selection of pieces of Lausanne silverware taking pride of place.

The most amazing item is surely the incredible model representing 17th century Lausanne on a 1/200 scale. It is based on a 1638 map made from a high view point and the first cadastral map of 1723.

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Details

Founded: 1918
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bart Geels (5 months ago)
Leuk voor een uurtje. Ik had er zelf wat meer van verwacht. Daarnaast is vrij weinig vertaald naar het Engels...
Lucy Gunner (9 months ago)
Awesome model of historic Lausanne. Cool building. Entry isn't too expensive. No English info for the audio of the model city exhibition yet.
Enrico Stura (11 months ago)
If you live in Lausanne, it's a must see. You can understand the reason why its urbanistic situation is what it is now, and learn the historic background of its evolution, through photos, movies and descriptions. A mock up of the town in its late middle age, occupying an entire hall, is probably the most attractive element in the exhibition.
I M (15 months ago)
Great Museum! Very interesting with a brand new exhibition. The garden has a beautiful view on the city.
Nir Aviv Shapir (15 months ago)
So much fun to visit and the audio visual guide is really good!!! After the visit be sure to visit the Notre Dame cathedral and climb all the way to the top!!! An unforgettable view of Lake Geneva and the Swiss Alps is sure to stay with you!!!
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