Sigtuna Museum

Sigtuna, Sweden

Sigtuna Museum exhibits the history of Sigtuna, Sweden's oldest medieval city. The museum is located on the site where the first royal palace was built in the late 900’s AD. The museum dates back to 1916 and the current museum has been built in the 1960s with new showrooms, reception and storage. The permanent exhibition displays Sigtuna's earliest history. Although the museum is active in many areas the archaeological part is strongly represented. There is one of the largest collections of archaeological findings in Sweden.

The museum also includes City Hall, a well-preserved 1700’s building, Lundströmska farm, a store with 19th century atmosphere and mayor’s farm. These houses are open in summer season. The museum has also an underground hall for temporary exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 1916
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

More Information

www.sigtunamuseum.se

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Svensson (6 months ago)
More of a kindergarten than a museum.. but a nice shop
Tanmoy Santra (7 months ago)
Good
Jana Rodrigues (8 months ago)
There is a lot of information in their computers however not much to see.
הילה לוינסון (12 months ago)
Nice
Vasant Padhiyar (3 years ago)
Nice to visit.. But not up to the expectations..
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