Vaumarcus Castle is a medieval castle, which hosts today a shopping center. Vaumarcus is a good example of the transformation, which took place in most castles in the 13th century when they were protected to defend agains new weapons, such as throwing machines.

There was initially an entrance to the castle more than 7 m above ground level. It was undoubtedly reached from the outside by a wooden stairs, which were removed in danger. The kitchen was on the ground floor.

The family of Vaumarcus has experienced financial difficulties for a long time. Pierre Vaumarcus sold the castle and the territories to the Count Rollin of Neuchâtel. He strengthened the primitive construction by erecting a gothic gate on the ground floor, with a drawbridge in front.

The castle Vaumarcus was besieged by the Swiss army after the Battle of Grandson in 1476. The old castle was rebuilt after 1476; the new castle, which is located in the north-east, was surrounded by a terrace rebuilt in 1773.

Today, the castle has an international central administration, a family and gastronomic restaurant and a cultural center.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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www.chateauvaumarcus.ch

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