There may have been two or three wooden churches in Kökar since the last half of 14th century. During the 16th century a Franciscan monastery was founded on Hamnö island. This place became a spiritual and cultural centre for the entire archipelago.

Today the ruins of monastery share their site with current Kökar's church, which is probably third in this place. It was built between 1769 and 1784 in charge of Antti Piimänen (he died before church was completed). Stones of previous monasteries were used in the construction. In the chapel beside the church are archaeological excavations on Hamnö.

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Address

762 24, Kökar, Finland
See all sites in Kökar

Details

Founded: 1769-1784
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesper Hellström (2 years ago)
Nico Ojala (2 years ago)
Mahtavat maisemat.
Anton Eklund (3 years ago)
En trevlig liten kyrka!
Eerik Lehto (3 years ago)
Hieno vanha kirkko ja hautausmaa täynnä historiaa. Vieressä myös vanhan fransiskaaniluostarin rauniot ja museo. Isoilla rantaniityillä on myös paljon hienoja perhosia.
Saleem ur Rahman (3 years ago)
Nice place
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