The Church of St. Anna

Kumlinge, Finland

First record of the church of Kumlinge is in a testament dated back to the year 1484. The church was consecrated to St. Anna. There have been probably a chapel and even two wooden churches before the present stone church, which was built approximately in 1510. Baroque fashioned belltower was erected in 1767.

There's also the oldest altarpiece in Finland (from year 1250) and wooden Madonna statue from the 15th century.

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Address

810, Kumlinge, Finland
See all sites in Kumlinge

Details

Founded: 1510
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

www.hasslebo.com

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Per Svahn (15 months ago)
Härlig miljö delar av kyrkan kan var från början av medeltiden men iconographic och att kyrkan omnämns i arvsrätt på 1400 talets början tyder att den nuvarande är från sent 1300 tal.. Helt värt ett besök.
Vlad Vasilyev (16 months ago)
Janne Koskinen (16 months ago)
Kaverit eivät päästäneet sisään koska olivat pihalla syömässä.
Kjell Fredriksen (19 months ago)
Fredfullt
Titouan SENECHAL (2 years ago)
Très jolie église, peinte à l'intérieur ce qui est une très belle surprise lorsque l'on ne s'y attend pas.
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