Kunstmuseum Basel

Basel, Switzerland

The Kunstmuseum Basel houses the largest and most significant public art collection in Switzerland. The Kunstmuseum possesses the largest collection of works by the Holbein family. Further examples of Renaissance art include important pieces by such masters as Konrad Witz, Hans Baldung (called Grien), Martin Schongauer, Lucas Cranach the Elder and Mathias Grünewald.

The main features of the 17th and 18th centuries are the Flemish and Dutch schools (e.g. Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt, Jan Brueghel the Elder), German and Dutch still life painting. Key works from the 19th century include the Impressionists represented by Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Paul Gauguin, Paul Cézanne as well as the paintings by Vincent van Gogh and Switzerland’s Arnold Böcklin and Ferdinand Hodler.

In the 20th century, the focus is on works of Cubism with Picasso, Braque and Juan Gris. Expressionism is represented by such figures as Edvard Munch, Franz Marc, Oskar Kokoschka and Emil Nolde. The collection also includes works from Constructivism, Dadaism and Surrealism and American art since 1950. Further highlights are the unique compilations of works from Pablo Picasso, Fernand Léger, Paul Klee, Alberto Giacometti and Marc Chagall.

In the realm of more recent and contemporary art, the collection maintains substantial bodies of work by Swiss, German, Italian, and American artists, including Joseph Beuys, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Georg Baselitz, A.R. Penck, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, Jonathan Borofsky, Roni Horn, Francesco Clemente, Mimmo Paladino, Enzo Cucchi, Martin Disler, Leiko Ikemura, Markus Raetz, Rosemarie Trockel and Robert Gober.

The Kunstmuseum’s main building was designed and constructed 1931-1936 by architects Paul Bonatz und Rudolf Christ.

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Details

Founded: 1931-1936
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raquel (3 months ago)
A very nice museum with a very extensive art selection. If you want to properly visit it, it will take you at least 2 hours. Also grateful that it was quiet at the time I visited, and not crowded. Many different artworks from Picasso to Kandinsky, as well as other less well-known artists from the Swiss region. An unforgettable time in a beautiful place!
BF Bangkok (3 months ago)
What a great experience. Very nice with a lot of art. A must see if you are in Basel!
Colin Ramby (3 months ago)
Really cool museum. Definitely liked the old part better than the new
Rafael Zaleta (5 months ago)
Impressive! The old and new buildings are whatever you could have imagined of a museum and more. The fix expositions are interesting and there is always something new in there. If you come yo Basel is a must.
Eugen Martynov (6 months ago)
I got discount from municipality. Which is nice! The map/schema a bit cryptic, but after you realise rooms layout you will understand it. I met old and new names - great experience! Cafe was nice but expensive, but it is Switzerland. You can also use lockers for your things and coats. I put mine just on hanger and it was fine. Definitely recommend!
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