The Tower of David is an ancient citadel located near the Jaffa Gate entrance to western edge of the Old City of Jerusalem. The citadel that stands today dates to the Mamluk and Ottoman periods. It was built on the site of an earlier ancient fortification of the Hasmonean, Herodian-era, Byzantine and Early Muslim periods, after being destroyed repeatedly during the last decades of Crusader presence in the Holy Land by Ayyubid and Mamluk rulers. It contains important archaeological finds dating back over 2,000 years including a quarry dated to the First Temple period, and is a popular venue for benefit events, craft shows, concerts, and sound-and-light performances.

As evidenced by the archaeological discovery of the Broad Wall, King Hezekiah (c. 739 - c. 687 BCE) was the first to specifically fortify this area. The city's fortifications demonstrate that by the late eighth century the city had expanded to include the hill to the west of the Temple Mount. The motivation for building the walled fortification was the expected invasion of Judea by Sennacherib.

The museum

The Tower of David Museum is today located in the citadel. The museum presents Jerusalem’s story. It details the major events in its history beginning with the first evidence of a city in Jerusalem in the second millennium BCE, until the city became the capital of the State of Israel, as well as its significance to three religions. The permanent exhibition illustrates the city’s history along the axis of time using myriad methods and includes explanations in Hebrew, Arabic and English.

The Citadel itself is a fascinating archaeological site. The finds uncovered within are a testimony to Jerusalem’s eventful past and produce a representation of Jerusalem and its various historical periods in microcosm. The Citadel’s towers offer a 360-degree view of the Old City of Jerusalem as well as the city’s modern areas.

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Details

Founded: c. 700 BC
Category: Castles and fortifications in Israel

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Chalupowicz-Gurfinkel (9 months ago)
Beautiful presentation at night. Very impressive. Highly recommend wearing warm clothes... super cold
HASIA OFER (9 months ago)
Amazing amazing amazing. So fantastic words cannot describe the feeling. Just captivating !!!
Sara Chitrik (9 months ago)
Kids really enjoyed it. It was very busy and not enough staff to take control. The family trampoline can be replaced by something more exciting ?
Udi Shvekey (11 months ago)
Beautiful place! Don't miss the night shows! It is something spectacular! There are also many other attractions to do once there. Don't miss it!
Unsraw King Pokémon (18 months ago)
The city its self has much history even before the Romans took the city off the rebels who held onto it for a good time considering who they were up against. also The Templar's lived here I believe?.
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