Gräpplang Castle Ruins

Flums, Switzerland

The first documented reference to the Gräpplang castle dates from the year 1249. It was built around 1220 by the Knights of Flums. During the Old Zurich War (1436-1450), the castle was extorted in 1440 to get protection, but it was never attacked or destroyed.

In 1528 the property was given to Ludwig Tschudi von Glarus. The castle remained in their family possession until 1767. The Tschudi family gave the castle its recognizable appearance. However, the construction work was carried out in poor quality which caused expensive maintenance work. As there was no interest in preserving the castle, it was sold for demolition in 1804. Recyclable materials such as bricks, iron mountings, fixtures, woodwork and building blocks were sold whenever possible.

In 1923, the ruins of Gräpplang Castle were taken over by the commune of Flums and during the following years, extensive building work was carried out to restore the castle. A few years ago the “Pro Gräpplang” foundation was formed, which organises cultural events in and around the Gräpplang ruins.

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Founded: c. 1220
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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