Lindau Lighthouse is the southernmost lighthouse in Germany, located on Lake Constance. The lighthouse was built from 1853 to 1856 at the western mole in the entrance to the harbour of Lindau and was first lit on 4 October 1856. It succeeded the light station in the Mangturm tower of 1230.

During the first years of operation the light was created by an open oil fire. At that time the keeper would steadily have to keep the fire burning in great pans and operate a bell and foghorn. The firing was later converted to kerosene and then gas. Since 1936 the tower has been operated electrically and was automated in the early 1990s. The light is lit on demand by ships using radio signals. The light characteristic is one flash every three seconds which is created by two rotating parabolic reflectors.

The lighthouse and the entire port of Lindau were originally built by the Bavarian Railway Company and later used to be operated by the shipping department for Lake Constance of Deutsche Bahn. Eventually the port was sold to the city works of Constance in 2002 together with the Bodensee-Schiffsbetriebe GmbH shipping company. After several years of negotiations the port area and thus the lighthouse were transferred to the town of Lindau in April 2010. It is open to visitors who may find information on local fauna and flora and on Lake Constance shipping.

The lighthouse is a popular subject for photographs.

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Founded: 1853-1856
Category:
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jeffery Smith (2 years ago)
Great spot to take in some fresh air and see the beautiful Lake Constanz
Patrick Turner (2 years ago)
Lindau is one of the most beautiful towns you will visit so why not walk up to the top of the Lighthouse to take in the views of the area!
Jean (2 years ago)
I've traveled a fair amount my whole life. Lisbon and Maderia Portugal, Spain, all over Italy, Austria and Germany. Lindau Germany is by far my favorite place I've ever visited. We're going again this October! It's magical, lots of shopping and lovely cafes and restaurants.
Anderson England (2 years ago)
A wonderful experience to really see a fantastic view from above of the old town. The view of the Bodensee and the mountains of Austria and Switzerland was marvelous too. The cost us well worth the experience. Great for kids. You can stop on many levels along the way. There are entertaining murals and artifacts from the old lighthouse on display throughout.
GTMC (2 years ago)
Why pay when you can use a drone? Just kidding... the fare is quite cheap for the panoramic view at the top of the lighthouse. You need to be quite fit to climb the many flights of stairs. Still worth the money and climb at the end of the day!!
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