Iberg Castle is located south-west of the town of Wattwil. The central keep is six stories tall and has an entrance on the north-west corner. The keep is surrounded by a curtain wall. The castle hill is protected by moats and some walls.

Iberg Castle was built in 1240 by Heinrich von Iberg who was a vassal of the Prince-Abbot of St. Gallen. The castle was briefly conquered in 1249 following the Toggenburg fratricide and again in 1290 during the rule of the anti-Abbot Konrad von Gundelfingen in St. Gallen. It was damaged during the Appenzell Wars in 1405 and soon thereafter rebuilt. During the conflicts leading to the Battles of Villmergen (from 1699-1712), the castle was besieged in 1710. After the Treaty of Baden in 1718 it was given back to the Abbot.

During the suppression of the monasteries in 1805, the castle became privately owned. Some of the housing was demolished in 1835, but the roof and battlements were rebuilt in 1902 and 1965 by the municipality.

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Wattwil, Switzerland
See all sites in Wattwil

Details

Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tanya Baumann (2 years ago)
Während nid so viel drögeler dörte wers super..vor allem fürd Kind isches super
Kurt Hofstetter (2 years ago)
Tolle Lage und gut unterhalten die ganze Anlage.
Andreas Kinas (2 years ago)
Eine schöne alte Ruine. Von hier oben hat man eine tolle Sicht auf Wattwil. Öffnungszeiten beachten.
Leo Pfiffner (2 years ago)
Ein schöner Ort oberhalb von Wattwil mit einer schönen Aussicht. Mit dem Auto kann man bis in die Nähe fahren und nur noch 10 Minuten zu Fuss. Leider gibt es eine Gittertüre vor dem Eingang, die in den Wintermonaten geschlossen bleibt.
A. Gadient (3 years ago)
Von der Burg Iberg ist doch ein Turm vollständig erhalten, während das übrige des Gebäudekomplexes nur noch an den Mauerstücken erhalten ist. Die Aussicht erlaubt sich vorzustellen, wie die Bewohner aus dieser Warte, feindliche Bewegungen frühzeitig erkennen konnten und einigelten. Für Interessenten der Geschichte, ein animierender Ort.
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