Skånelaholm Castle

Rosersberg, Sweden

In the 13th century Skånelaholm was owned by the King Magnus III of Sweden. He sold the manor to the Skokloster monastery in 1276. After the Reformation Skånelaholm was confiscated to the Crown. In 1641 Anders Gyldenklou aqcuired the manor and completed the present castle couple years later. After several owners Herbert Rettig donated the manor to Vitterhetsakademien (Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities) in 1962. Today it is open to the public in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1643
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edgars Dambītis (2 months ago)
Perfekt destination for cycling
erik cicic (3 months ago)
Amzing pleace
Erik de Ruiter (10 months ago)
It's built on a nice location, especially extra beautiful with the sun going down. The buildings itself on the outside are a bit boring, layout and garden surrounding it are oké.
Ke Li (15 months ago)
interesting place! if you come the right time there is a guide tour.
Petter Senften (16 months ago)
Small mansion from the 17th century located in beautiful surroundings. Come here and have a Swedish fika, then hang out on the lawn. Guided tours of the mansion during the summer. There's a small café and the parking is free.
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