Puerta de Alcalá

Madrid, Spain

The Puerta de Alcalá is a Neo-classical monument in the Plaza de la Independencia in Madrid. It is regarded as the first modern post-Roman triumphal archbuilt in Europe, older than the similar monuments Arc de Triomphe in Paris and Brandenburg Gate in Berlin.

Puerta de Alcalá was a gate of the former city walls built by Philip IV. It stands near the city center and several meters away from the main entrance to the Parque del Buen Retiro. The square is bisected by Alcalá Street, although the street does not cross through the monument, and it is the origin of the Alfonso XII, Serrano and Olózaga streets. Its name originates from the old path from Madrid to the nearby town of Alcalá de Henares.

Madrid in the late 18th century still looked like a somewhat drab borough, surrounded by medieval walls. Around the year 1774, king Charles III commissioned Francesco Sabatini to construct a monumental gate in the city wall through which an expanded road to the city of Alcalá was to pass, replacing an older, smaller, gate that stood nearby. It was inaugurated in 1778.

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Founded: 1778
Category: Statues in Spain

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sougata Mukherjee (10 months ago)
Peaceful. Lots of trees n swan. Best place to hang out with family
Michael Ravenscroft (13 months ago)
A Neo-classical gate in the Plaza de la Independencia in Madrid, Spain. It was a gate of the former Walls of Philip IV. Many believe structures such as the Arc de Triomphe and India Gate are direct descendants of this very iconic gate which once housed the entrance to the Spanish palace. This is an iconic place in Madrid and the restaurants around this place are simply wonderful! Its a nice change to be in an open space in a somewhat congested part of the old city. But its a beautiful place though!!!
Luna Gabriela Garibaldi (13 months ago)
Beautiful place to see, any time of the year.
Cristina Vila (13 months ago)
A beautiful view, specially at sunset. Love the red flowers as well!
Andrimar Gamboa (13 months ago)
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