Historic City of Toledo

Toledo, Spain

Successively a Roman municipium, the capital of the Visigothic Kingdom, a fortress of the Emirate of Cordoba, an outpost of the Christian kingdoms fighting the Moors and, in the 16th century, the temporary seat of supreme power under Charles V, Toledo is the repository of more than 2,000 years of history. Its masterpieces are the product of heterogeneous civilizations in an environment where the existence of three major religions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – was a major factor.

Toledo is one of the Spanish cities with the greatest wealth of monuments. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986 for its extensive monumental and cultural heritage.

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Address

Plaza Mayor 1, Toledo, Spain
See all sites in Toledo

Details

Founded: around 200 BC
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Muhammad Imran (16 months ago)
When you enter this castelle and you will see one side statue of an Empire and opposite side a board where you will anaylize the whole campus of this Bisagra Fort. The board is made by iron and the map of this old fort is embroided on it.
Enzo Dettoni (17 months ago)
Toledo is a jewel! Must to see!
kjurdi (17 months ago)
A place full of history.
Hugo Batista (20 months ago)
Toledo ... a medieval town very well preserved. The city of Toledo well known for its steel. Knight armor and cutlery are icons of the city. At Easter, the city dresses up for the celebrations. It looks wonderful ...
Laura (2 years ago)
Oh my gosh I am in love with Toledo. What a stunning place. We were lucky enough to stay in a house right by the gate and it was a stunning setting. Just poking about the streets around here provides some wonderful picture ops. But seriously, just go to Toledo, beautiful place
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Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.