El Greco Museum

Toledo, Spain

The El Greco Museum celebrates the mannerist painter El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1541–1614), who spent much of his life in Toledo, having been born in Fodele, Crete.

The museum opened in 1911 and is located in the Jewish Quarter of Toledo. It consists of two buildings, a 16th-century house with a courtyard and an early 20th century building forming the museum, together with a garden. The house recreates the home of El Greco, which no longer exists. The museum houses many artworks by El Greco, especially from his late period. There are also paintings by other 17th-century Spanish artists, as well as furniture from the period and pottery from Talavera de la Reina in the Province of Toledo.

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Details

Founded: 1911
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ralf Tenbrink (14 months ago)
Free to enter and worth a visit. Even if you not into old art it's a great historic building.
eagle mars (14 months ago)
Deception. You expect to visit the house of El Greco, but it is not. You expect to see El Greco's masterpieces and most of them are in Madrid or elsewhere. Bad for me, I should have done my homework in advance. Consider it just being a folklor museum with some paintings from various artists, including late El Greco's paintings.
john wilkes (15 months ago)
We were expecting to be somewhat underwhelmed, but found this to be a beautifully presented small museum built around some spectacular El Greco works, as well as some of his near contemporaries. The building itself proved interesting - it helped established the style for "boutique" artist venues. There was an informative video about his painting techniques that helped us look at the paintings in a new light.
Ivan Knezevic (16 months ago)
A nice little museum with a beautiful garden. Good for an hours's tour.
Magnus S (18 months ago)
Nice "little" museum, not so much artwork but some really nice pieces. My visit was ~45 minutes, and then I took my time at the paintings I liked. When I was there there there was no entrance fee, I could bring and use my camera (no flash) but I had to leave my backpack outside.
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