El Greco Museum

Toledo, Spain

The El Greco Museum celebrates the mannerist painter El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1541–1614), who spent much of his life in Toledo, having been born in Fodele, Crete.

The museum opened in 1911 and is located in the Jewish Quarter of Toledo. It consists of two buildings, a 16th-century house with a courtyard and an early 20th century building forming the museum, together with a garden. The house recreates the home of El Greco, which no longer exists. The museum houses many artworks by El Greco, especially from his late period. There are also paintings by other 17th-century Spanish artists, as well as furniture from the period and pottery from Talavera de la Reina in the Province of Toledo.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1911
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ralf Tenbrink (15 months ago)
Free to enter and worth a visit. Even if you not into old art it's a great historic building.
eagle mars (15 months ago)
Deception. You expect to visit the house of El Greco, but it is not. You expect to see El Greco's masterpieces and most of them are in Madrid or elsewhere. Bad for me, I should have done my homework in advance. Consider it just being a folklor museum with some paintings from various artists, including late El Greco's paintings.
john wilkes (16 months ago)
We were expecting to be somewhat underwhelmed, but found this to be a beautifully presented small museum built around some spectacular El Greco works, as well as some of his near contemporaries. The building itself proved interesting - it helped established the style for "boutique" artist venues. There was an informative video about his painting techniques that helped us look at the paintings in a new light.
Ivan Knezevic (17 months ago)
A nice little museum with a beautiful garden. Good for an hours's tour.
Magnus S (19 months ago)
Nice "little" museum, not so much artwork but some really nice pieces. My visit was ~45 minutes, and then I took my time at the paintings I liked. When I was there there there was no entrance fee, I could bring and use my camera (no flash) but I had to leave my backpack outside.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.