Fuensalida Palace

Toledo, Spain

The Palace of Fuensalida was built at the end of the first half of the 15th century by Pedro López de Ayala, the first lord of Fuensalida, is the best palace exponent of the Toledan Mudéjar, a historical typology that is scarce in Toledo built heritage, where merge three styles: Gothic, Plateresque and Mudéjar.

It is integrated in a big block, which also includes the Taller del Moro and the Iglesia de Santo Tomé, which forms the north façade of the Plaza del Conde.

The first Count of Fuensalida, Pedro López de Ayala, carved this house towards 1440 for the mayorazgos of this title, of which was founder. This first Count of Fuensalida, son of the famous Chancellor López de Ayala, was main mayor of Toledo, mayor of the fortresses of the city, and, consequently, retired mayor of the King.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, despite his pilgrimage, landed in Toledo no less than nineteen homes, and he lived in this Palace while the construction of the Alcázar was completed. In his letters and in its courtyard, the child who would become king, Philip II, experienced some of his childhood experiences, along with his mother, the Empress. Today, a sculpture by Pompeo Leoni representing Isabel of Portugal presides over the courtyard of Fuensalida.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

maria martin gomez (2 years ago)
Precioso
eric abramovich (2 years ago)
Very attractive. One of many sites. Worth stopping by if you are in Jewish quarter. Pay attention to the design surrounding the doorways.
Pablo Paredes (2 years ago)
Un edificio increíble, lastima que no sea visitable,
santi guillamon (4 years ago)
Stunning
Brian Jwo (4 years ago)
Its ok ~ pics is fine and no need to go in!
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