Pedraza Castle

Pedraza, Spain

Pedraza Castle dates from the 13th century and it was rebuilt in the 15th century by García Herrera and again in the early 16th century by the Dukes of Frías.

Poligonal ground plan, double enclosure, with cues and square turrets, plus an artificial moat excavated in the rock. The castle uses part of the wall and preserves the remains of one front, with Romanesque elements.

The tower that serves as the tower of homage uses a different bonding that the rest of the castle. It used to be owned by the Herrera and the Velasco (Dukes of Frías) families. The sons of the king of France, Frans I, were kept hostage in this castle in the 16th century.

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Address

Calle Mayor 22, Pedraza, Spain
See all sites in Pedraza

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oliver Siegel (2 years ago)
Not bad, but 7€ is slightly overpriced
Christian Gruber (2 years ago)
It was closed the day we went but those small-town was gorgeous and the restaurant was delicious. Tiny roads a top of a mountain really made it a genuine experience.
Chin Serng Siew (2 years ago)
Don't waste your money on this castle
Rodrigo Araujo (2 years ago)
Historical, charming, cozy area. Some small posadas to host you in this calm place
Alan J Rubin (3 years ago)
Very cool castle along with the whole town of Pedraza, definitely a must if visiting the town
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